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ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r*— IIVI^/\ A Pioneering Educational Conimniiity 



Volume 6 No. I •Fall 1991 



Dr. Carl Sagan Takes IMSA Community and Special 
Guests on Journey Through Space and Time 

Inaugural James R. Thompson Leadership Lecture Draws Hundreds 



L\.fl; 



ore than 1 .500 guests from 
throughout Illinois packed the 
Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy's gym October 2 to hear 
world-renowned astrophysicist Dr. Carl 
Sagan speak about one of his favorite 
subjects. 

Sagan. director of the Laboratory for 
Planetary Studies at Cornell University, 
gave the first James R. Thompson 
Leadership Lecture entitled "Comets and 
the Origin of Life." 

In her introduction. IMSA Executive 
Director Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall 
noted that the lecture came at a time of 
growing national and international atten- 
tion on mathematics and science achieve- 
ment. 

"It is indeed fitting that our first 
Thompson Leadership Lecture would 
focus on science and its contributions to 
human understanding and would feature 
one of the world's foremost science 
scholars." Marshall said. 

During the lecture. Sagan took the 
audience beyond Darwin's theory of 



S I D 



Admissions 3 

From the Executive Director 2 

North Central Accreditation 3 

Russian Resource Teacher 8 

Student Sailplane Pilot 6 

Students Visit Naval Academy 6 

Trailblazers 7 




Mdir ihan 1.500 i^iwsls ancmkd IMSA s just James K. ihompson Lauh'iship l.ccliiir. i^ivcn by 
Dr. Carl Sat^aji. Guests included: IMSA sliideitls. staff', trustees, aliuimi and parents: Illinois 
teachers in IMSA's IMPACT II and Summer 'AD' Ventures programs: selected students fnwi 
oilier .'iclwols: IMSA Fimd hoard members: and major business/corporate supporters. 



evolution. He theorized that comets, rich 
in organic ct)mpounds. slammed into the 
Earth perhaps four billion years ago cre- 
ating a chemical reaction from which life 
began. "We are the beneficiaries of the 
comets. We are beholden to the comets." 
he said. 

Guests said Sagan's lecture was full of 
fascinating infomiation wrapped w ith a 
"personal touch." "He made the topic 
easy enough for the entire audience to 
understand, but it was still a challenge 
and appealing to think about." said Dr. 
Ann O'Connell. a guest from William 
Dever Elementary School in Chicago. 
"He made several points — that scientists 



have to be adventurous, because no mat- 
ter how insignificant something may 
seem, it can make a real change in the 
future." 

The Thompson Leadership Lecture 
Series was established in 1990 following 
a gift from an anonymous donor to the 
IMSA Fund for Advancement of 
Education. The donor chose to honor 
Thompson for his years of service as 
governor of Illinois and his leadership in 
establishing the Academy. Thompson, 
who attended the lecture, described it as a 
"brilliant tour through the cosmic world," 

(continued on page 4) 



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r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 WesI Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1039 
708/801-6000 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lcdemian, Nobel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 
Professor. University of Chicago 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean. College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Sheila Griftm 

Director of Corporate Advertising Worldvv ide 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Gary D, Jewel 
Superintendent of Schools 
Aurora West School District #129 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Dr. George Rink 

Research Geneticist 

North Central Forest Experiment Station 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School. Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

■Staff Writer 

Brenda Buschhachcr 



From the 

Executive 

Director 





^^^, 


4. 




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Dear Members of the IMSA Community. 

■ am pleased to report a very successful beginning to the Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy's sixth school year. We have enjoyed a busy and highly produc- 
tive first quarter. Faculty, staff, students, parents and community volunteers have 
worked diligently this fall to develop action plans for the next cycle of strategic plan- 
ning. It is indeed gratifying to work with such dedicated people as we continue our 
journey of "re-creation toward extraordinary purpose." 

We were honored that Governor Jim Edgar chose IMSA as the site for his 
November 22 news conference announcing the release of capital funds for three impor- 
tant projects: acoustical and laboratories renovations, and office construction. These 
facility improvements will support new academic programs and provide enhanced 
opportunities for students and teachers across Illinois who are part of IMSA's external 
community of scholars. 

Dr. Carl Sagan's visit on October 2 was a special milestone in the Academy's his- 
tory. We were pleased to have such an accomplished scientific scholar give the inaugu- 
ral James R. Thompson Leadership Lecture. Toward the end of the month, we were 
delighted to host members of IMSA's North Central External Evaluation Team who 
were on campus to assess IMSA's programs as part of a unique approach to accredita- 
tion. We will share information from their report in the Winter 1992 NOVA. 

Also in the next NOVA we will report longitudinal research survey findings about 
IMSA's second graduating clas,s — the Class of 1990. The data indicate that we are 
experiencing success in our efforts to develop "decidedly different learners." 

In the area of IMSA's external program initiatives, we are now accepting applica- 
tions for Summer "AD'Ventures and IMPACT II and working closely with District 
Learning Leadership Teams in their efforts to restructure mathematics and science edu- 
cation to ensure improved student performance. As our statewide program initiatives 
continue to expand, school districts, schools, teachers and students throughout Illinois 
benefit. The impact on IMSA is positive too. as we continue to learn from others' 
experiences and insights. 

Sincerely, 



Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



o 



National Experts Evaluate IMSA in Unique 
Approach to North Central Accreditation 



A team of national experts in cur- 
riculum, instruction, assessment, 
organizational culture and student devel- 
opment visited the Illinois Mathematics 
and Science Academy this fall to evaluate 
IMSA's programs. The team was chaired 
by Dr. Gordon Cawelti. executive direc- 
tor of the Association for Super\ision and 
Curriculum Dexelopment in Washington. 
D.C. 

The team's visit was part of a unique 
approach to accreditation approved for 




Dr. David Workman, physics tecuu leader, 
shares information about IMSA 's innovative 
Science. Society and the Future course with 
Dr. Mar\' .Aivi Louderback . 




Dr. Stephanie Marshall, executive director, 
welcomes Dr. James Ratcliff to the Illiiwis 
Mathematics and Science Academx. 



IMSA by the North Central Association. 
In a departure from the more traditional 
means of accreditation. IMSA is being 
evaluated on its strategic plan, rather than 
the more frequently u.sed .self-study. In 
addition, the use of state evaluators was 
expanded to include national experts. 
During their visit, evaluation team 
members ob.served clas.ses. talked to staff 
and students, reviewed policies and prac- 
tices, and identified ways in which the 
strategic plan was or was not having an 



impact on life at IMSA. A report of their 
findings and recommendations will be 
released later this year and reported in the 
Winter 1992 NOVA. 

"We are looking forward to reviewing 
what they saw as strengths and what they 
saw as areas for improvement."' said 
IMSA Executive Director Dr. Stephanie 
Pace Marshall. 

In addition to Cawelti. members of 
IMSA's NCA external evaluation team 
include: 



Dr. .ALlexinia Baldwin 

University of Connecticut 
Elisabeth Bond 

Northern Illinois University 
Dr. Donald Casey 

Northwestern University 
Dr. Daniel Chazan 

Michigan State University 
Dr. Nicholas Colangelo 

University of Iowa 
Dr. Terrence Deal 

Vanderbilt University 
Dr. Wade Freeman 

Unixersity of Illinois at Chicago 
Shirley Frye 

Consultant in Mathematics Education 
Dr. James Gallagher 

University of North Carolina 
Dr. James Joseph Gallagher 

Michigan State University 
Dr. Eugene Garcia 

University of California. Santa Cruz 
Dr. Howard Gardner 

Harvard University 
Dr. Michael Haney 

Blair Science. Mathematics and 

Computer Science Magnet Program 

(Maryland) 
John Hillary 

Township High School District 214, 

Arlington Heights, Illinois 
Harvard Knowles 

Phillips Exeter Academy, 

New Hampshire 



Dr. Mary Ann Louderback 

Illinois Office of the Governor 
Dr. James Marett 

Northern Illinois University 
Dr. Craig Nelson 

Indiana University 
Dr. John Novak 

Eastern Michigan University 
Dr. Robert Palaich 

Education Commission of the States 
Dr. Chris Pipho 

Education Commission of the States 
Dr. Al Ramirez 

Illinois State Board of Education 
Dr. James Ratcliff 

Pennsylvania State University 
Dr. Lewis Rhodes 

American Association of School 

Administrators 
Dr. Thomas Romberg 

University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Dr. Ray Schaljo 

Illinois State Board of Education 
Dr. Jon Swanson 

Illinois Benedictine College 
Dr. Scott Thomson 

National Policy Board for Educational 

Administration 
Dr. Arthur White 

Ohio State University 
Dr. Robert Yager 

University of Iowa 
Evelyn Yeagle 

Yeagle Professional Education 

Consulting. Grand Rapids. Michigan 



o 




IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President 

James R. Thompson 

Partner and Chairman of the Executive Committee 

Winston & Strawn 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Staley Continental, Inc. 

Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Copley Memorial Hospital 

Secretary/Treasurer 

Paul J.O'Hollaren 

Director General 

Loyal Order of the Moose 

Directors 

Linda Anderson 
Civic Leader 

Roger E, Anderson 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Continental Bank of Chicago 

G.Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball Company 

Marjorie Craig Benton 

President, Chapin Hall Center for Children 

University of Chicago 

Michael J. Birck 
President 
Tellabs, Inc. 

Richard H. Brown 
President 
Illinois Bell 

Wiilard Bunn III 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Marine Corporation 

Susan S. Horwilz 
Chairman and President 
Aurora National Bank 

Dr. Leon M. Lederman. Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Professor 

University of Chicago 

Steven H. Lesnik 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Lesnik and Company 

Gordon R. Lohman 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Amsted Industries, Inc. 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Harry C. Stonecipher 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Sundstrand Corporation 

William J. White 

President. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Bell & Howell Company 

Director of Institutional Advancement 

Ted Parge 



Carl Sag^^^ (continued from fmge l) 

adding that it reinforced the importance 
of supporting space exploration. 

During his afternoon at IMSA, Sagan 
also met with IMSA students and facuhy. 



held a news conference and spoke at a 
reception honoring major donors to the 
IMSA Fund for Advancement of 
Education. 




Dr. Carl Sagan autographs copies of his best-selling hook. Cosmos, for Marlene Meegan, 
circulation supenisor, to place in IMSA 's lihran: 




IMSA leaders and special friends enjoy a relaxing nunnent together before Dr. Sagan \s lecture. 
Pictured are James R. Thompson, president, IMSA Fund for Advancement of Education: Donald 
E. Nordlund. executive vice-president, IMSA Fund: Dr. Carl Sagan: Dr. Stephanie Marshall, 
IMSA executive director: Jayne Thompson: Dr. Leon Lederman, vice president, hoard of 
trustees: and Walter Lee. student council president. 



Academic Enrichment Programs 
Encourage iVIinority Students 



/ A total of 37 Chicago ninth graders 
Z_ — \_ are spending their Saturda> s in 
iliL- classroom as part of the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy's 
1991-92 Earh ln\ol\ement Program 
(EIP). 

In its third year, this program is 
designed primarily to help increase the 
number and competitiveness of black. 
Hispanic and economically disadvan- 
taged students who apply to IMSA. The 
program is supported by a grant from the 
Albert Pick Jr. Fund of Chicago. 

This year, there are 12 Saturday morn- 
ing sessions (October- February). Held at 
the University of Illinois at Chicago, 
these are taught by Veni Strong. IMSA 
mathematics teacher: Bill Stepien. IMSA 
resident counselor: and Chicago public 
school teachers Ed Caster and Yolanda 
Weaver. 

The EIP curriculum includes "hands- 
on" and group problem-soh ing activities 
as well as some preparation for the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test. Students also 
will attend an overnight retreat at IMSA 
in eariv Febmarv. In addition. IMSA 



staff members will present sessions for 
parents on the academic and social/emo- 
tional needs of gifted children. 

Elissa Laird. IMSA's pre-admissions 
coordinator, said the program is designed 
to help students improve their science, 
mathematics and communications skills. 
"We believe it is critical for the Academy 
to play a leadership role in identifying 
and encouraging talented minority stu- 
dents, particularly those from unden-epre- 
sented racial groups." she said. "This is 
even more important as the demograph- 
ics of our country continue to change. 
Supporting talented black and Hispanic 
students is an investment not only in their 
future, but also in the future of our state. 
nation and world." 

The Early Involvement Program is one 
of several initiatives designed to encour- 
age minority students who are interested 
in mathematics and science. Other pro- 
grams involve Chicago. Aurora/Joliet 
and East St. Louis students in grades 7-9. 
As ninth graders, students are eligible, 
though not required, to apply for admis- 
sion to IMSA. 



Admissions Counselors Hold 
Statewide Informational Meetings 



To help prospective students and 
parents from throughout Illinois 
learn more about the Academy. IMSA 
has scheduled 49 statewide informational 
meetings this fall and winter. 

A total of nine meetings will be held in 
Chicago. Other sites include Carlinville. 
Champaign. Collins\ ille. Crystal Lake. 
Danville. Decatur. Deertield. DeKalb. 
Dixon. East St. Louis. Effingham. Elgin. 
Elmhurst. Evanston. Freeport. Galesburg. 
Grayslake. Harvey, Hoffman Estates, 
Homewood/Flossmoor, Jacksonville, 
Joliet. Kankakee. Macomb. Marion. 
Mattoon. Moline. Mt. Vernon. Normal. 
Oglesby. Palos Heights, Peoria, Pontiac. 



Quincy. Robinson. Rockford. Spring- 
field. Vernon Hills. Waukegan and West 
Chicago. 

In addition, prospective students and 
parents are invited to attend one of three 
Visitor Information Program Days at the 
Academy. These will be held December 7. 
1:00 p.m.; January .^1. 2:00 p.m.: and 
February 9, 1 :00 p.m. 

The deadline for application to IMSA's 
seventh sophomore class — the Class of 
1995 — is March 1, 1992. For more infor- 
mation about the admissions process, 
statewide informational meetings or VIP 
Days, call (708) 801-6027 or in Illinois. 
1-800-526-1239. 




Orientation activities for IMSA's neu 
sophomores included the highly-popu- 
lar Physics Olympics. 

IMSA Enrolls 
Sixth 

Sophomore 
Class 

H ""his fall, the Illinois Mathe- 

ki matics and Science Academy 
community welcomed its sixth class 
of students — the 240-inember Class 
of 1994. 

Dr. LuAnn Smith, director of ad- 
missions, said choosing the new class 
from a pool of 8 1 9 applicants was a 
difficult challenge. "The selection 
committee was extremely impressed 
with the credentials of all the appli- 
cants," she said. 

The new sophomores represent 
166 schools and 142 communities 
throughout Illinois, include 109 girls 
and 1 3 1 boys, and have an average 
SAT score of 653 in mathematics and 
524 in verbal. 

"We congratulate the home schools 
for the accomplishments of their stu- 
dents, and we are pleased with the 
increasing support that teachers, coun- 
selors and administrators are giving to 
prospective students who decide to 
apply to IMSA." Smith said. 



IMSA Sophomore 
On Cloud Nine 
in His Sailplane 

By Sandra S. Park, 
Student Writer 



V 



j I hen the sun isn't shining, it may 
V_ be a eioudy day for some peo- 
ple, but for IMSA sophomore Niccolo 
Delia Penna, it"s a perfect day to tly. 
Delia Penna of Mokena loves to tly sail- 
planes. His unusual interest is rooted in 
his family's strong connection to the 
sport; both his father and grandfather 
are pilots. 

Sailplanes are aircraft without an 
engine, allowing them to be more respon- 
sive to a pilot's maneuvers. They are 
pulled into the sky 2000 feet by a tow 
plane and then released. Each flight 
usually lasts 20 minutes, depending on 
the weather which is a key factor in a 
successful flight. Puffy non-rain clouds 
are ideal. Once in the air. a pilot must 
"search the clouds" in order to find 
the lift necessary to maintain a stable 
altitude. 

"It takes time to learn how the plane 
flies, the different maneuvers, and how to 
react in an emergency situation." Delia 
Penna said. Although one of the main 
goals is to sustain the plane as long as 







possible, glider aviation is also per- 
formed for the pure joy of flying. 

Delia Penna' s first major goal, his solo 
privilege, was achieved in July 1991 after 
four months of practice behind the con- 
trols of a Blanik L- 1 3 at Windy City 
Soaring in Plainfield's Clow Airport. 
The Blanik is a 30-foot Czechoslovakian 
metal sailplane that has dive brakes for 
improper landing approaches. "I was 
excited but not nervous," Delia Penna 
said. "I felt confident about what I was 
doing." 

Since Julv. Delia Penna has been aim- 



ailplane pilot Niccolo Delia 

Penna. a sophomore from 

Mokena. recently earned 

his solo flight privileges. 



ing for a private pilot's license which 
would allow him to carry passengers. 
In order to obtain the permit by his 1 6th 
birthday, he needs to pass an exam and 
have credited seven hours of solo 
experience. 

When asked about the danger involved, 
Delia Penna said sailplane flying is just 
like any other sport. "You don't think 
about the danger, you concentrate on 
what you have to do and enjoy it too." 

Sandra S. Park, a junior from Wheaton. 
is a work sen'ice student in the IMSA 
Communications Office. 



IMSA Students Visit U.S. Naval Academy 



I "~cn students from the Illinois 
I Mathematics and Science Aca- 
demy attended the fourth annual student 
conference of the National Consortium 
for Specialized Secondary Schools of 
Mathematics. Science and Technology 
October 24-27 in Greenbelt. Maryland. 

Representing IMSA were Ginger 
Elliott of Wheaton, Amanda Kracen of 
Sycamore, Sonia Lai of Glendale 
Heights, Richard Lee of Hoopeston, 
Monica McCullough of Lisle, Noah 
Rosenberg of Chicago, Kevin Solofra of 
Oak Forest, Ann Walch of Springfield, 
Sinclair Wu of Downers Grove and 



James Young of Bourbonnais. 

IMSA students joined students from 23 
other consortium schools throughout the 
country for sessions at the U.S. Naval 
Academy on physics, chemistry, robotics, 
electrical engineering, mechanical engi- 
neering, aerospace engineering, oceanog- 
raphy and computer science. The confer- 
ence was hosted by The Science and 
Technology Center at the Eleanor 
Roo.sevelt High School. 

During their stay students also visited 
the Maryland Science Center and the 
Smithsonian Institute in Washington. 
D.C. Maryland Congressman Steny 



Hoyer gave the keynote address, focusing 
on students' social responsibilities and 
ethical implications in science and 
technology. 

Founded in 1988. the consortium con- 
sists of specialized high schools with 
advanced programs for talented mathe- 
matics and science students. IMSA is a 
charter member of the consortium. The 
annual student conferences are designed 
to acquaint students of similar interests 
and abilities and to encourage them to 
work together to solve scientific 
problems. 



T R A I L B L A Z E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

Execiili\c Director Dr. Stephanie 
Pace Marshall ga\ e the keynote address 
to 300 scientists from Argonne National 
Laboratory during the lab's 1991-92 
special colloquium. 

Dr. Marcelline Barron, director of 
academic programs. ga\ e a presentation 
entitled "Innovative Approaches to 
Curriculum and Assessment for Gifted 
Secondary Students" at the annual con- 
ference of the Midwest Educational 
Research Association, held in Chicago. 

Patrick LaMaster, physics teacher, 
conducted workshops on teaching mod- 
em physics at the 1991 Modem Physics 
Conference in Mexico City and 
Intemational Physics Education 
Conference in Caracas. Venezuela. 

Dr. David Barr. director of infomia- 
tion and communication systems. Marti 
Guarin, head librarian, and Andrew 
Brool<, IMSA student, presented a 
hands-on session about classroom tech- 
nology at the American Association of 
School Administrators' National 
Conference of Women School 
Executives, held in Chicago in 
November. 

IMSA physics teacher Mark Horrell 

recently published a paper entitled 
"Phytogeograph\ and Paleoclimatic 
Interpretation of the Maestrichtian" 
in the joumal Palaeogeography. 
Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 

College and Career Counselor Joe 
Prieto presented a session on stress man- 
agement entitled "Stressed Out or 
Dancing to the Music? The Choice is 
Yours" at the National Association of 
College Admission Counselors annual 
conference held in New Orleans in 
October. 



Junior Andrew Brook of Honard demon- 
strates the latest in computer and audio- 
visual technology for a participant in the 
American Association of School 
Administrators ' National Conference of 
Women School Executives. 



Student and Staff 
Achievements 

On No\ ember 14. the Chicago Tribune 
reported that members of IMSA's Class 
of 1991 led the nation with an a\erage 
American College Test exam score of 
3 1 .4. 

A total of 129 IMSA seniors (75<7f ) 
qualified as semitlnalists or recei\ed let- 
ters of commendation in this year's 
National Merit Scholarship Corporation 
competition. Another tv\o seniors quali- 
fied as semifinalists in the National 
Achie\ement Scholarship Program for 
Outstanding Negro Students. 

Senior Sinclair Wu of Dow ners Grove 
won first place in the national 
Swackhamer Student Essay Contest 
sponsored by the Nuclear Age Peace 
Foundation. 

Junior Steven Crutchfield of Chicago 
was named an "Extra Effort Award" 
v\'inner by WGN-TV. The award is pre- 
sented to teenagers in ninth through 
twelfth grades who have demonstrated 
commitment to scholastic achievement, 
social responsibility and extracurricular 
activities. 

This fall. IMSA awarded the first inno- 
vations and initiatives mini-arants. total- 



ing more than $8,000. to nine employees: 
Phylli.s Chesnut and Patricia 
McGovern, secretaries; Michael 
DeHaven, Susan Eddins, Barbara 
Greenberg. Bernard Hollister and 
Hilary Rosenthal, teachers; Cheryl 
McGuirk, social worker: and Andrea 
Swenson, resident counselor. Supported 
by contributions to the IMSA Fund for 
Advancement of Education, these grants 
enable employees to implement creative 
ideas that support IMSA's mission. 

Alumni Achievements 

Mae Hung, '89. DePauw University. 
was one of seven student reporters for 
campus radio station WGRE-FM who 
won new s broadcast awards from the 
Indiana Associated Press Broadcasters 
and the Indiana Press Club. 

Mike Peil, "90. 'Wake Forest 
Uni\ersity. was elected \ice president of 
the WFU chapter of Sigma Phi Sigma, a 
national physics fratemity. 

Wendy Hansen, '89, North Central 
College, was one of four Illinois students 
who received a scholarship from the 
Institute of Intemational Education to 
study wildlife ecology and management 
at the Scht)ol for Field Studies in Kenya. 

Stephanie Jayne. "90. University of 
North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was selected 
to spend the 1991-92 school year study- 
ing social policy at the University of 
Ulster in Northern Ireland. 




Russian Teacher Joins IMSA 
Staff for 1991-92 School Year 



By Noel Bush, 
Student Writer 

H — en years ago Alexander 

|_ Victoro\ich Ptilsin only dreamed 
about coming to the United States to 
teach his native language to students 
here. This year Ptitsin is living out his 
dream at the Illinois Mathematics and 
Science Academy. 

He began his ten-month position at 
IMSA in September, and credited recent 
political changes in his homeland with 
making his \ isit possible. "One of the 
examples that change is good is that I am 
teaching here today." Ptitsin said. 

Ptitsin" s \'isit is supported by the 
American Council of Teachers of Russian 
(ACTR)/Ford Foundation Program for 
Russian in the Schools. Last year. IMSA 
was named a "Ford Model School" quali- 
fying the Academy to host a resource 
teacher/curriculum development consul- 
tant from the Soviet Union. 

The 28-year-old Ptitsin is teaching 
classes, developing curriculum materials 
and helping the foreign language faculty 
further refine its Russian language 
program. 

Ptitsin graduated in 1985 from the 
Pvaticorsk Institute of Lancuaaes where 



he now teaches. "I was interested in the 
relations between teachers and students." 
he says of his career choice, "and I had a 
lot of good examples," 

Ptitsin said teaching Russian to 
English-speaking students is a unique 
opportunity. "It is more interesting 
because you can see the results of your 
teaching immediately." Ptitsin added that 
IMSA students have lived up to his 
expectations. "They learn very quickly." 
he said. 

In many ways. Ptitsin finds American 
teenagers to be very similar to Russian 
students. "They have their own problems, 
their own points of view, and they try to 
express these points of view." he said. 
One noticeable difference, according to 
Ptitsin, is that Russian students cannot 
express their personalities through cloth- 
ing as much as American students, 
because most Russian schools enforce 
a uniform dress code. 

Ptitsin is optimistic about recent 
reforms in the Soviet government, noting 
that greater cooperation between the cen- 
tral union, individual republics and rest 
of the world will create more exchamjes 




If' 



■1 



Alexander Ptilsin. IMSA's Russian 
resource teaclier, performs folk songs for 
students at a local elementarx school. 



of teachers, students and educational 
ideas among nations. 

While at IMSA, Ptitsin is available to 
consult with other Illinois schools that 
have or are trymg to start Russian lan- 
guage programs. School districts interest- 
ed in his work should contact Dr. 
Marcelline Barron, director of academic 
programs, at (708) 801-6071. 

Noel Bush, a soiior from Piuckneyville. is 
a work service student in the IMSA 
Communications Office. 



r^lMSA 

Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illinois 60506-1039 



NON PROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 
PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



^IMSA 



Critter Days, Canoe Trips and Lab Experiments 
Stimulate Student Interest in Biology 



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ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



A Pioneering Educational Conununity 



Volume 6 No. 2 • Winter 1992 



-Students in IMSA"s University 
^ '*' Biology course are not just learning 
iboul lil'e under the power of a micro- 
;cope. According to instructor Joe Traina, 
;ome of the most valuable learning occurs 
n out-of-class field experiences. 

A required course for all IMSA 
uniors. University Biology has evolved 
.ignificantly through the years — from 
/esterday's rigorous but fairly traditional 
:ourse to today's innovative, discovery- 
lased course. 

Students now design and conduct their 
>wn experiments to test concepts such as 
)smosis. Labs are less structured and 
nore open-ended; instead of "filling in 
he blanks." students write their own 
observations, evaluations and applica- 
ions. 

IMSA junior Nora Chen of Morton 
jrove likes the freedom allowed during 
ab experiments and the chance to choose 
ler own path for learning. "We're not 
eally led or told where to go or what to 
lo." she said. "Sometimes that uncertainty 
nakes class confusing, but then the chal- 
enge and reward is that much greater." 

Dr. Sue Styer. instructor, said one of 




A AS Science Encounters. 

rom the Executive Director 2 

[MSA Alliance/External Program 6 

iMSA Fund/Miss Saigon 4 

Jational Curriculum Award 6 

Itrategic Plan 5 

"railblazers 7 



the most interesting experiments is the 
dissection of bam owl pellets. "The pellet 
looks like a hairball when regurgitated by 
the owl. It contains the undigestible 
parts of the prey including the bones, and 
by piecing together the parts, students 
discover what the prey is." Styer said. 
Students then make a food chain and 
food web based on what they find. 

Iguanas and Snapping Turtles 

Field trips and "critter days" are other 
popular activities. "To help students 
develop an appreciation of wildlife, 
1 periodically bring in organisms and 
we discuss their behavior and natural 
history," Traina said. "We want students 
to know how the animal kingdom inter- 
acts with other life forms." Critters that 
have crossed the threshold of University 
Biology include a boa constrictor, 
iguana, ferret, bullfrog, snapping turtle, 
ovenbird. brown snake and praying 
mantis. 

Field experiments include canoe trips 
down the Fox and Kickapoo Rivers, bird- 
ing trips to local forest preserves and trips 
to the grocery store to study nutrition. 
TTiis winter Traina took students on a 
tracking trip. "By following various tracks 
in the snow and mud. students learned a lot 
about animal behavior." he said. 

Biology After Chemistry and Physics 

John Thompson, biology team coordi- 
nator, said IMSA's University Biology 
course differs from traditional high 
school biology courses in several impor- 
tant ways. For instance, IMSA students 
take biology after physics and chemistry. 

Icontinued on page 8) 




IMSA '.V sinitegic plan calls for increasing 
the number and types of discovery-based 
laboratory learning experiences for 
students. (DIG-IT Photographs) 

IMSA Strategic Plan 

In June 1990. the IMSA board of 
trustees approved the Academy's first 
strategic plan, launching an era of 
"recreation toward extraordinary 
purpose." Faculty and staff began 
implementing action plans that fall. 
In March 1991. IMSA's strategic 
planning team recommended several 
new strategies and some revisions in 
existing strategies. New action plans 
were developed during the summer 
and fall of 1991. On January 13. 1992. 
the board unanimously approved a 
"new" strategic plan for the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy. 
Key components appear on page 5. 




Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

150(1 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1039 
708/801-6000 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman. Nobel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboralor>' 
Professor, University of Chicago 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher oi Physics 
Qumcy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean. College of Education 
University of llhnois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Corporate Advertising Worldwide 

Motorola Incorporated 

Gary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Gary D. Jewel 
Superintendent of Schools 
Aurora West School District #129 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Sirunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percv Julian Junior Hieh School. Oak Park 



NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Staff Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 




Dear Members of the IMSA Community, 

T~ his is an exciting time at the IIHnois Mathematics and Science Academy, and it 
is my privilege to share with you some of the recent highhghts. 

In January, the board of trustees unanimously approved a revised strategic plan for 
IMSA — a plan that boldly articulates our vision for the future and provides direction on 
how we will achieve our goals. 

In the area of external programs, we recently hosted school leaders from throughout 
Illinois who were on campus to continue their work as participants in IMSA"s District 
Learning Leadership Teams initiative. We also selected students for our 1992 Summer 
"AD" Ventures program, and in a few weeks will award IMPACT II disseminator and 
adaptor grants to another group of outstanding Illinois teachers. 

In the area of institutional advancement, IMSA recently received a major grant 
valued at $325,000 from The Grainger Foundation to build and operate an inventors' 
workshop. We are most grateful for this very generous gift. In addition, we recently 
learned that IMSA and the Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington. D.C., 
have been named co-beneficiaries of a $250,000 congressional grant to the Smithsonian 
Institution. This grant will enable our schools to develop and test curriculum models 
that integrate instruction in mathematics, science, the arts and humanities. 

Just recently, we were honored to host Dr. Elena Lenskaya and Dr. Victor Bolotov. 
senior officials from the Department of the Ministry of Education in Russia. They were 
part of an official state visit to the U.S. to explore possible joint ventures between our 
two countries. We were deeply moved and inspired to learn about the leadership role 
education leaders played in resisting the coup attempt last summer, and we were hon- 
ored that IMSA was the only school selected to be part of this official state visit. 



Sincerely. 




/-/^--tc^ 



^M^/ 



Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



m 



niiiK 



Survey of Graduates Underscores Success of 
IMSA's Academic and Residential Programs 



A survey of the Illinois Mathematics 
and Science Academy's (IMS A) 
second graduating class — the Class of 
1990 — indicates the Academy is begin- 
ning to achie\ e its goal of de\ eloping 
"decidedly different learners'" — students 
who can think, critically, conduct 
research, identify and soh e problems, 
and see and deal with the ""w hole picture" 
rather than just parts of a situation. 

The data show that IMSA's 1990 grad- 
uates have very different "habits of 
mind" compared to a group of equally 
bright students w ho did not attend a pub- 
lic residential high school like IMSA. 
The IMSA students were significantly 
more likely to be independent thinkers, 
tolerate ambiguity, look at multiple per- 
spectives and accept the fact that not all 
questions have absolute answers. 



"Our mission is to develop leaders 
who know the joy of discovering and 
forging interconnections among mathe- 
matics, science, the arts and the 
humanities. We are pleased that our 
p-aduates are making these connec- 
tions and becoming interdisciplinary 
'hinkers, learners and leaders. " 

Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall 
IMS.A Executive Director 

For its research. IMSA used a group of 
comparison students identified by the 
Talent Identification Program at Duke 
Unuersity (21 students) and the Center 
for the Advancement of Academically 
Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins 
University (56 students). Both of these 
run fast-paced summer programs in sci- 
ence and mathematics for academically 
talented students. A total of 132 of 
IMSA's 167-member Class of 1990 
participated in the survey. 

The study also compared IMSA's 1990 
graduates to IMSA's 1989 graduates, 
uncovering se\eral notable differences. 
For example, the 1 990 graduates were 
more likely to credit IMSA with improv- 



ing their natural skills in conducting empir- 
ical research. IMSA officials belie\ e this 
can be attributed to the fact that the first 
class did not have as many research oppor- 
tunities as the second class had. 



(TcU'phiiiH' inti'r\ic\\:s of the conipuri- 
son stiulents and IMSA 's 1990 ;.;r(uluiiU'\ 
were cimduvtcd by the Public Opinion 
Laboratory based at Northern llliiiois 
ihiiver.sitv. ) 



Other survey findings included: 



' IMSA's 1990 graduates reported waiv- 
ing 299 college courses. One-quarter 
entered college as sophomores. 

■ IMSA's 1990 graduates were more 
likely than comparison students to 
credit their high school with improving 
their natural skills in problem finding, 
problem solving, critical thinking and 
using ethics when problem solving. 

' IMSA's 1990 graduates were more 
likely than comparison students and 
IMSA's 1989 graduates to declare 
majors in science, mathematics and 
engineering. IMSA's 1990 graduates 
also were more likely than comparison 
students to declare double majors. 



' IMSA's 1990 graduates were more 
likely than comparison students to stay 
in touch with their high school class- 
mates, perhaps indicating the beginning 
of what IMSA hopes will be a lifelong 
professional network of peers who will 
work together to solve problems. 

' IMSA's 1990 graduates most frequent- 
ly mentioned three things as the best 
parts of the Academy's program: the 
quality of the faculty; interdisciplinary 
courses such as Science. Society and 
the Future: and the unique 24-hour 
"living and learning environment" that 
allows students to work and socialize 
with their intellectual peers. 




Dr. Steplninie Pace Marsludl. executive director, welcomes Governor Jim Edtior to the /llliiols 
Mathematics and Science Academy. Edgar visited IMSA in Novemher to annowice the release of 
capital funds for acoustical, laboratory and office renovations. Also on hand to greet the 
Governor were Student Council officers Michael McNamara. Punlta Gupta and Walter Lee. 



o 



IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President 

James R. Thompson 

Partner and Chairman of the Executive Committee 

Winston & Straw n 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Staley Continental. Inc. 

Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Copley Memonal Hospital 

Sec reta ry/Treasure r 

Paul J. O'Hollaren 

Director General 

Loyal Order of the Moose 

Directors 

Linda Anderson 
Civic Leader 

Roger E. Anderson 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Continental Bank of Chicago 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball Company 

Maijorie Craig Benton 

President, Chapin Hall Center for Children 

University of Chicago 

Michael J. Birck 
President 
Tellabs, Inc. 

Richard H. Brown 
President 
Illinois Bell 

Willard Bunn III 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Banc One Illinois Corporation 

Clifford L. Greenwalt 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Central Illinois Public Service Company 

Susan S. Horwitz 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Aurora National Bank 

John E. Jones 

President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

CB! Industries 

Dr. Leon M. Lederman, Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Professor 

University of Chicago 

Steven H. Lesnik 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Lesnik and Company 

Gordon R, Lohman 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Amsted industries. Inc. 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Harry C. Stonecipher 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Sundstrand Corporation 

William J. White 

President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Bell & Howell Companv 

Director of Institutional Advancement 

Ted Parge 



IMSA Fund Elects New Board 
Members; Welcomes New 
Corporate/Foundation Donors 



~he board of directors of the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy 
Fund for Advancement of Education 
recently elected two new members. 

John E. Jones of Hinsdale and Clifford 
L. Greenwalt of Springfield began their 
three-year terms December 1. 1991. 
Jones is president, chaimian and chief 
executive officer of CBI Industries in 
Oak Brook. Greenwalt is president and 
chief executive officer of Central Illinois 
Public Service Company in Springfield. 

The IMSA Fund welcomes the follow- 
ing first-time corporate and foundation 
donors of $500 or more (July 19. 1991- 



February 14, 1992) to the Council for 
Educational Distinction in Illinois: 

Applied Computer Technology, Inc. 
Central Illinois Public Service Co. 
ComCorp, Inc. 
Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc. 
Household International, Inc. 
Jewish Students Scholarship Fund 
Material Sciences Corporation 
Parco Foods, Inc. 
Polk Brothers Foundation, Inc. 
Precision Scientific, Inc. 
The Johnson Foundation 
The Quaker Oats Company 
Waste Management Inc. 



IMSA Community to 
Enjoy "Miss Saigon" 



/i limited amount of tickets 
— 1_ are still available for 
the 1992 Illinois Mathematics 
and Science Academy Fund Gala 
next fall. 

A special benefit matinee performance 
of the internationally acclaimed, award- 
winning broadway musical "Miss 
Saigon"" will be held on Sunday, 
November 1. 1992, at 3:00 p.m. 
at the Chicago Auditorium Theatre. 
The ticket price of $150 will include 
prime orchestra seating, a pre-curtain 
reception, and a tax deductible donation 
to the IMSA Fund for Advancement of 
Education. 

The benefit performance is sponsored 
by Illinois Bell. For ticket information, 
call the Academy's office of institutional 
advancement at (708) 801-6040. 




M9SS 

Saigon 



i 2 



I® 



Revised Strategic Plan Charts 
Bold Course for liVISA's Future 



^IMSA 



MISSION 



BELIEFS 



STRATEGIES 



ACTION PLANS 



Each strategy includes a set of action 
plans developed by members of the 
IMS A community (faculty/staff, stu- 
dents, parents and friends). More than 
80 action plans were approved as part 
of the 1992 revision; 38 will be imple- 
mented in the first phase (the next 
1-2 years). For specific information 
on action plans or other aspects of 
IMSA"s strategic plan, contact Dr. 
Connie Jo Hatcher, director of person- 
nel and planning, at (708) 801-6035. 



The mission of the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy, a 
community of scholars dedicated to intel- 
lectual exploration, is to develop leaders 
w ho know the joy of discovering and 
forgina interconnections amonn mathe- 



matics, science, the arts and the humani- 
ties, and who, by example and by instruc- 
tion, inspire others to live in harmony 
with themselves, other human beings and 
the physical world. 



We believe that 

• meaning is discovered not prescribed. 

• all individuals have equal intrinsic 
worth. 

• all people ha\e an innate desire to learn. 

• the power of the human mind is the 
world's greatest resource. 

• every individual is capable of both 
changing and bringing about change. 

• trust is essential for any human relation- 
ship to prosper. 

• the survival of global civilization 
depends primarily upon the quality of 
the education provided to all citizens. 

• every person is responsible for his/her 
own choices and actions. 

• belonging to a group implies subordina- 
tion of self-interests to the common 
good. 



• excellence is worth the effort but not 
always worth the cost. 

• achieving our vision of the future 
depends upon our willingness to sacri- 
fice in the present. 

• aversion to risk-taking stifles innova- 
tion and creativity. 

• learning is an individual, lifelong 
endeavor. 

• valuable learning results from both fail- 
ure and success. 

• all adults share responsibility for the 
well-being of all children. 

• the ability to discern and create connec- 
tions is the essence of knowing. 

• a good life is harmony among the emo- 
tions, the body, the intellect and the 
spirit. 

• the process of education is more than 
merely the accumulation of facts. 



• By our practice, we will reconfigure the 
Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy curriculum by developing a 
concept-centered curriculum. 

• We will build and support partnerships 
with students, teachers, and staff in 
schools, colleges/universities, within 
the private sector, and among agents of 
public policy throughout Illinois that 
forge the interconnections among math- 
ematics, science, the arts, and the 
humanities and that provide the founda- 
tion for statewide systemic change in 
mathematics, science, and technology 
education. 

• We will redefine student achievement 
and success. 

• By our practice we will redefine teach- 
ing as facilitating discovery through 
interconnecting. 

• We will recruit and support a diverse 
student population composed of learn- 



ers of exceptional talent in mathematics 
and science. 

' We will design an institutional 
advancement plan that will secure the 
support and participation of a con- 
stituency of individuals, corporations, 
foundations, educational institutions, 
and governmental agencies committed 
to the Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy's mission. 

' We will create, implement, and model 
an organizational system that facilitates 
the realization of our mission and 
objectives. 

' We will define and ensure standards of 
quality for all programs and practices. 

' We will ensure a living and learning 
environment that stimulates and sup- 
ports the academic, personal and social 
development of students. 

' We will build trust among students, 
parents, faculty and staff. 




IMSA Fosters Discovery-Based 
Science in Other Illinois Schools 



VI I hat began three years ago as a 
. \_ professional development experi- 
ence tor Illinois computer science and 
science teachers is now being preserved 
for future generations of students to use. 

Project A.S. S.I. S.T. began as a series 
of 12 workshops on superconductivity 
for 20 school- and district-based teams 
of junior high and secondary chemistry, 
phvsics and computer science teachers. 
Administered by IMSA. the program 
was funded through a scientific literacy 
grant; workshops were held at Argonne 
National Laboratory. 

In the summer of 1991 . Project 
A.S.S.l.S.T E.xteii.'iion was created so 
teachers could take what they learned and 
extend it into their respective classrooms. 

■"We wanted to preserve the ideas 
teachers learned by bringing them and 
their administrators to the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy to 
discuss how their work could impact stu- 
dents in their respective classrooms." said 
Dr. Ray Dagenais. project coordinator. 

Schools participating in Project 
A.S.S.l.S.T. E.xtension included 
Yorkville. Riverton. Lanark. Quincy. and 
Waubonsie Valley High Schools, and the 
University of Chicago Lab School. 

IMSA held two sessions for the teams 
this year focusing on discovery-based 
lessons in physics and chemistry. The 
final .session will give three selected stu- 
dents from each high school the opportu- 
nity to accompany their teachers. 

Albin Grill, science chairman at 
Waubonsie Valley High School, said the 
program showed him how computer soft- 
ware can be a valuable resource in a sci- 
ence curriculum. "This program was a 
tremendous help in demonstrating to us 
the value of software in the discovery 
approach to learning." Grill said. As a 
result, his department has purchased 
software programs to use in its physics 
and chemistry classes. 

Grill added, "Project A.S.S.l.S.T. 
Extension promotes student and teacher 
experimentation which is a positive move 
toward improving science education." 




/)) addition to serving Illinois schools ilirougli Project A.S.S.l.S.T. E.xtension, IMSA is helping 30 
school districts, partners in the IMSA/Motorola Universir\' District Learning Leadership Teams 
initiative, restructure their mathematics and science programs. IMSA hosted several teams in 
January, including Alton School District #1 1 (left), and the Teachers Academy of Mathematics 
and Science, Chicago (right). 



Problem-based Course Tapped for National Award 



The Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy is one of 25 winners in a 
national competition honoring innovative 
instruction. More than 600 school pro- 
grams from the U.S. and Canada vied for 
The E.xecntive Educator's 1992 "Profiles 
in Excellence" award. 

Winning programs, selected on the 
basis of creativity, replicability and cost 
effectiveness, are featured in the 
February issues of The Executive 
Echtcator and The American School 
Board Journal. IMSA was cited for its 
problem-based Science. Society and the 
Future (SSF) course, partially funded by 
the Hitachi Foundation. 

In the popular senior elective course, 
students use the facts and ideas of science 
and social science to confront ethical 
dilemmas inherent in making public poli- 
cy decisions about controversial issues. 

The course is taught by William J. 
Stepien, social science teacher, and Dr. 
David Workman, physics teacher. 



Stepien is helping several Illinois schools 
develop similar programs for their class- 
rooms. 




Students in IMSA 's award-ninning Science, 
Society and the Future course e.ximme a skele- 
ton as part of their study this semester on the 
role of science in criminal investigations. 



o 



T R A I L B L A Z E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

Executi\e Director Dr. Stephanie Pace 

Marshall is ser\ ing on a national panel to 
select the 77k' Executive Ediicaior's Top 
100 school executives in North America. 
Marshall is a two-time recipient of this 
award. She also has been named h\ 
Governor Jim Edgar to serve on the 
Illinois 2000 committee. 

Dr. LuAnn Smith, director of admis- 
sions, presented a paper entitled "Non- 
traditional Measures for the Identification 
of Academic Potential Among Minority 
Students" at the Illinois State Gifted 
Conference held in Chicago in December. 

Mathematics teachers Sue Eddins, 
Charles Hamberg and George 
Milauskas presented workshops on 
implementing the National Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics standards at the 
1992 Metropolitan Mathematics Club of 
Chicago conference in February. 

John Stark, German teacher, was 
selected by the American Association of 
Teachers of German to serve on a nation- 
al committee to develop professional 
standards for excellence in teaching 
German. Lily Huberman, Russian 
teacher, was elected president of the 
Illinois chapter of the American 
Association of Teachers of Slavic and 
East European Languages. French teach- 
ers Willa Shultz and Brenda Crosby led 
a teachers inservice on immersion tech- 
niques at Hariem High School in Loves 
Park. Illinois. 

George Milauskas, mathematics teach- 
er, authored the new edition of Geometiy 
for Enjoyment and Challenge. In addi- 
tion. Milauskas and mathematics teacher 
Charles Hamberg are co-authors of two 
books. Algebra I: An Integrated 
Approach and Algebra and Trigonometry. 

William J. Stepien, social science 
teacher, is writing a monthly problem- 
based column for the student edition of 
the Wall Street Journal. 



Student and Staff 
Achievements 

A total of 56 IMSA seniors have 
qualified as finalists in this year's 
National Merit Corporation Scholarship 
competition. 

Gretchen Green of Naperville was the 
first high school student in Illinois e\er 
invited to present a paper at the Illinois 
History Symposium. Her paper, present- 
ed in December, focused on Dr. Bertha 
Van Hoosen's contributions to women's 
medical care. 

A team of 19 students finished first in 
Illinois in the Knowledge Master Open 
competition held in December. The team 
placed ninth out of 1,661 schools in the 
nation. 

Rich Kick, mathematics teacher, pre- 
sented his work. "Supercollider Fixed 
Target Experiment-Slow Extraction from 
a Proton Storage Ring Using Crystal 
Channeling." at the 1992 Research 
Corporation Foundation for the 
Advancement of Science Conference in 
Tucson, Arizona, in January. 

Dr. Charles Cannon, chemistry teach- 
er, was named "Alumnus of the Year" at 
the National Alumni Association meeting 
of Alabama A & M University. 

Members of IMSA's 1991-92 astro- 
physics class wrote questions for WGN- 
TVs February broadcast of "The Cosmic 
Challenge." Special recognition goes to 
physics teacher Ed Mover, and students 
Henry Chong (Carbondale). Steve 
Crutchfield (Chicago). Amanda Kabak 
(Vernon Hills). Tom Shidle (Palatine). 
David Vakil (Carbondale) and Jim 
Young (Bourbonnais). 



Alumni Achievements 

Rowan Lockvvood, "89, Yale 
University, is co-founder of Science and 
Math Achiever Teams Inc. (SMArT). 
The program, w hich has been cited by 
President Bush's Points of Light 
Foundation, links Yale volunteers with 
students from an inner-city New Haven, 
Connecticut, public school. 

The following alumni were selected to 
study abroad in 1991-92: Lisa 
Greskiwcz, '90, Illinois State University, 
Curtin University. Australia; Mitch 
Gordon, '89, Tufts University. 
University College of the University of 
London: Catherine Zavadowsky, '89, 
Bradley University, the University of 
Wales-Swansea: Krista Rakers, "89. 
Mount Mercy College. Palacky 
University, Czechoslovakia. 

Rob McCool and James Browne, '91, 
University of lllinois-Urbana, are work- 
ing as systems administrators for the 
Software Tools Group at the National 
Center for Supercomputing Applications. 



This issue of NOVA 

is dedicated in loving memory of 

Rachel Szech of Waukegan. 

May 9, 1975 - January 2,^1992 

Member of IMSA's Class of 1993 




A student in IMSA 's Early Involvement 
Program (EIP) enjoys a relaxing 
moment in the student union. This pro- 
gram is one of several initiatives 
designed to improve the number and 
competitiveness of minority students 
who apply to the Academy. An 
overnight retreat in Fehruaiy gave EIP 
students the chance to experience aca- 
demic and residential life at IMSA. 




students Attend AAAS Conference Biology 



(conliinieil from page 1) 



By Sandra S. Park, Student Writer 

{_^^ indents from the Illinois 
Cl]^ Mathematics and Science Academy 
had the chance to rub shoulders with 
some of the world's foremost scientists 
during the 1992 annual meeting of the 
American Association for the 
Advancement of Science (AAAS), 
held in Chicago in February. 

IMSA students attended "Science 
Encounters." a special day of activities 
sponsored by AAAS for high school stu- 
dents from the Chicagoland area. 
Students attended sessions on topics such 
as cosmochemistry, the ozone, careers in 
engineering and the standard model. 

In addition, students enjoyed a keynote 
lecture by Dr. Mae C. Jemison, 
America's first black astronaut candi- 




date, and small-group discussions over 
lunch with individual scientists. 

Junior Liz Pine enjoyed Jemison's 
lecture in which she discussed her child- 
hood and interest in science. "It was a 
good message of perseverance and dedi- 
cation." Pine said. "She showed us that 
anyone can make it if they try and 
work." 

Junior Steve Crutchfield saluted 
AAAS' commitment to mathematics and 
science education. "It was good to invite 
high school students to this kind of con- 
ference to encourage them in math and 
science." he said. 

Sandra S. Park, a junior from Wheaton. 
is a work service studeut in the IMSA 
communications office. 

Siiiulrii S. Pink and Btnl>ara 
Greenherg. IMSA chemistry 
teacher, meet Alan Lane, a 
presenter at the AAAS 92 Science 
Encounters yontli conference. 
Lane is a biology professor at 
Triton College. 



Most schools teach biology first. The 
advantage of IMSA's sequencing, 
according to Thompson and others, is 
that students can study biology more 
in-depth. 

"Biology and the earth sciences are 
based on chemistry and physics. By 




Biology slndents James Klempir and Monique 
Lin and instructor Joe Traina (center) examine 
a shrub gnawed by a beaver. 

having students take chemistry and 
physics first, we don't have to spend time 
covering principles such as organic 
molecules," Thompson said. "Students 
can move into in-depth studies much 
quicker." 

Junior Jim Young of Bourbonnais 
enjoys the course because it is conducted 
like real world science. "You don't i 

always know what the answer will be or 
can predict what will happen," he said. 
"It's how science really works." 



r^lMSA 

Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60306-1039 



NONPROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



NORTH CENTRAL REPORT 

We had iinended to include c.xeerpt.s from 
IMSA's North Central External Evaluation 
report in this issue of NOVA. Because of a 
short delay in receiving the report, we will 
include this information in the next issue 
instead. Tliank you for your uiiderstandinc. 



L 




A 



ILLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r*— IIVlSA -^ Pioneering Educationai Communis 



Volume 6 No. 3 • Spring l'-)92 



North Central Accreditation Report Praises 
IMSA's Vision and Strategic Plan Achievements 



'-1 -* he Illinois Mathematics and 

^ Science Academy has received 
high marks from a team of national 
experts in curriculum, instruction, assess- 
ment, organizational culture and student 
deselopment. 

Members visited the campus earlier 
this \ ear in a unique approach to accredi- 
tation approv ed for IMSA b> the North 
Central Association of Schools and 
Colleges. The team was chaired by Dr. 
Gordon Cawelti. executive director of the 
Association for Supervision and 
Curriculum De%elopment. the largest 
education leadership organization in the 
country. 

Instead of using North Central's tradi- 
tional ""self-study" format. IMSA was 
evaluated on its strategic plan. 
Specifically, team members were asked 
to assess ways in which the strategic plan 
was or was not having an impact on life 
at IMSA. "'We wanted to know their 
impressions" said IMSA Executive 
Director Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, 
"for if the plan truly serves as a strategic 
document that focuses efforts and 



resources, its impact should be apparent 
in the Academy's programs and actual 
practices." 

Real changes in education come 
from need and leadersliip. America 
has lots of tlie former and Utile of the 
latter .... Occasionally there Is an 
opportunity to build an exemplar, one 
that is so powerful that it shows clear- 
ly wluil can he done hy showing what 
is being done. IMSA is becoming that 
exemplar. When it is fully realized, it 
will be a blueprint for how to recon- 
struct education. 

North Central Accreditation Report 



The report praises IMSA for. among 
other things: 

' an inno\ati\e class schedule that 
pros ides time for students to engage in 
research with IMSA's resident scientist 
and with mcntiMs at corporate and go\ - 
ernmeiu laboratories in northern Illinois: 

(continued on page .' J 






SIDE 



ASCD Presidency 5 V "W 

Grainger hnentors' Workshop 4 ^^ jf^ 

IMPACT II. Summer "AD' Ventures 5 ^ % '^^ ^ 

IMSA Students in Russia 3 

Mathematical Investigations 6 i 

Roman Empire Simulation 8 | 

Smithsonian Grant 6 iz , 

Trailblazers 7 5 /•• j 






Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

15()U\VcslSulli\anRoad 
Aurora. Illinois 6U506-1000 
708/801-6000 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Lederman. Nohel Laureate 
Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 
Professor. University of Chicago 

Trustees 

John Baird 
Teacher of Physics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Larry Braskamp 
Dean. College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Sheila Griftm 

Director of Corporate Advertising Worldwide 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Gary D, Jewel 
Superintendent of Schools 
Aurora West School District #129 

Robert Leininger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachern Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Department of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Strunk 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School, Oak Park 

NOVA is published quarterly by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Staff Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 



gj^ 




_^^^H|^.>^^^^^^H| 



Dear Members of the IMSA Community, 

'—I — his has been quite an eventlul spring, and I am pleased to report several 
l_ highlights at this time. 

On May 4-6. IMSA convened a national conference on problem-based learning at 
the internationally-renowned Wingspread Conference Center in Racine. Wisconsin. 
The Academy has been piloting problem-based learning in several courses, most 
noticeably Science. Society and the Future. This award-winning course features the 
use of "ill-structured problems"" to foster the development of students" problem finding, 
problem solving, critical thinking and ethical decision-making skills. We appreciate 
the generous support of the Hitachi Foundation and the Johnson Foundation in under- 
writing this important conference. 

The Academy"s annual Teacher Recognition Day was, as in previous years, a very 
special event. IMSA sophomores nominated home school teachers from throughout 
Illinois — teachers who had challenged and supported them in very special ways in the 
past. These outstanding educators were honored at a special recognition ceremony on 
April 10, at which time they received the 1992 IMSA Award of Excellence. We at 
IMSA are proud to can"y on the work started by our students" home school teachers. 

We are pleased to announce that it has been a banner year for the 1991-92 IMSA 
Fund annual campaign. For the first time in IMSA"s history, the campaign has sur- 
passed the $900, 000 mark thanks to the generous support of more than 700 donors. 
With several weeks left in this fiscal year, which ends June 30, we look forward to 
additional investments from both current and new donors. 

Guests who visit IMSA this summer may experience some of the inconveniences 
associated with renovation and construction. Laboratory, acoustical and office projects 
will be under way, and we ask that you please "pardon our dust."" 

On a final note, let me congratulate members of IMSA"s fourth graduating class, the 
Class of 1992. We appreciate the many contributions these fine young men and women 
have made to our community and we wish them all the best in the years ahead. At the 
same time, we welcome the newest members of our community. IMSA"s Class of 1995. 



Sincerely 

Stephanie Pace Marshall. Ph.D. 
Executive Director 



T-K-LCy 



^^M^Ai 



o 



F 



IMSA Students Experience 
Life in Post-USSR Russia 

By Noel C. Bush, Student Writer 



•-i "* w eh e of my classmates, our 

1_ teacher and I were in for a nice 
surprise when we stepped off an airplane 
in Moscow St. Patrick's Day and were 
greeted by Michael Peil. a 1990 IMSA 
graduate. 

"This place is wonderful!"" said Peil. a 
Wake Forest University student who 
attended Moscow State Uni\ersit\ this 
semester. Peil shared w ith us some of his 
experiences, including se\eral demon- 
strations he had w itnessed firsthand, 
before we left b\ train for our destina- 
tion. RostoN -on-Don. Russia. 

We were in Russia as participants in 
the US-USSR High School Academic 
Partnership Program. This was IMSA"s 
final year in a three-year exchange pro- 
gram w ith School 36 in Rostov-on-Don. 
a city of two million in the southern part 
of Russia. During our two weeks there, 
we learned about the history of the Don 
River region, the lives of contemporary 
Russians and the differences between 
American and Russian schools. 

At School 36. students attend classes 
Monday-Saturday. I was especially 
impressed with the school "s innovati\e 
course in technical translation. We also 
enjoyed our time with School 36 students 
and their families, "it w as amazing to 
talk w ith the students about growing up 
in Russia and disco\ er that teenagers are 
much the same all over the world."" said 
junior Gena Ghcaring of Lincoln. 

After leaving Rosto\-on-Don. we 
spent several days in Moscow and St. 
Petersburg. While traveling on the 
trains, we were able to see a great deal of 
the Russian countryside and talk with 
Russian tra\ elers about their li\es. One 
commented that "...monarchy. Stalinism. 
communism, democracy — it"s all the 
same. What matters is what works for 
the people. You Americans want us to 
have democracy, we'll have democracy 
for a while. If that doesn't work, we'll 
try something else." 

Karin Engman. a junior from Elgin. 




Dr. Christum Nokkeimed. social scii'iice teacher, and Dr. Stephanie Pace Marshall, executive 
director, admire a gift from School 36. Rostov-on-Don. Russia— IMSA 's partner in the US-USSR 
High School .Academic Partnership Program. Students from the two schools visited each others' 
campuses and homes for several weeks this spring. (Photo by Cathy Veal) 



was struck by the diversity of the Russian 
people. "They are not all of one mind 
like the American media often portray 
them to be. There are so many different 
groups, each with its own ideas about 
where the former Soviet Union should be 
headed," she said. "It's difficult to fore- 
see how a solution to their political situa- 
tion will be achieved." 

We also visited many historical land- 
marks in Moscow and St. Petersburg, 
including the Kremlin. Izmaelevsky 
Park, the Bolshoi Theater, and the 



Hermitage. These experiences deepened 
our understanding of and appreciation for 
the Russian consciousness that has 
shaped that country and which now is 
playing a large role in determining the 
future of the former Soviet Union. 

Noel Bush, a senior from Piiickneyville. 
is a work seirice student in the IMSA 
Coinititinicatitnts Office. He was one 
of the 13 IMSA studeiUs who visited 
Rostov-on-Don. Russia, earlier this xear. 



North CGntfdl {continued fnmi page D 



• interdisciplinary "concept-centered" 
courses which rely on student experimen- 
tation more than textbooks and lectures; 

• programs designed to recruit more 
minority students; 

• the positive nature of teacher and stu- 
dent interaction; and 

• a culture of participatory manage- 
ment that involves faculty and staff in 
institutional decision-making. 

All of these, according to the report, 
are "evidence"" that the strategic plan is 



being implemented in IMSA's policies, 
programs and practices. 

The report also contains recommenda- 
tions for continued work. These include 
pro\ iding more time for faculty training 
in integrative curriculum development, 
monitoring vvell-de\eloped curriculum 
programs alread\ in use across the coun- 
try to determine those that could be help- 
ful to IMSA. and providing more time for 
students to work w ith teams of teachers 
from different subject areas. 



o 



JUSH 



IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Presidcnl 

James R. Thompson 

Partner iind Chairman ol the Executive CommlUee 

Winston & Strawn 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Stalcy Continental. Inc. 

Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Copley Memonal Hospital 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Paul J.O'HolIaren 

Director General 

Loyal Order of the Moose 

Directors 

Linda Anderson 
Civic Leader 

Roger E. Anderson 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Continental Bank of Chicago 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball Company 

Marjorie Craig Benton 

President. Chapin Hall Center for Children 

University of Chicago 

Michael J. Birck 
President 
Tellabs, Inc. 

Richard H. Brown 
President 
Illinois Bell 

Willard Bunn III 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Banc One Illinois Corporation 

Clifford L. Greenwall 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Central Illinois Public Service Company 

Susan S. Horwitz 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Aurora National Bank 

John E. Jones 

President. Chairman and Chief Executi\e Officer 

CB! Industries 

Dr. Leon M. Lederman. Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Professor 

University of Chicago 

Steven H. Lesnik 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Lesnik and Company 

Gordon R. Lohman 

Presidcnl and Chief Executive Officer 

Amstcd Industries. Inc. 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora industries 

Harr> C. Stonccipher 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Sundstrand Corporation 

William J. White 

Presidcnl, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Bell & Howell Compan> 

Director of Institutional Advancement 

Ted Purge 



Grainger Grant Supports 
Inventors' Workshop at IMSA 



1-1 — he Illinois Mathematics and 

L Science Academy (IMSA) has 
rcceiNcd a grant valued at S325.0(K) t'mm 
The Grainger Foundation to construct 
and operate an inventors" workshop at 
IMSA. This is the Academy's largest 
private sector grant to date, and it puts 
the IMSA Fund for Advancement of 
Education over the $3 million mark in 
fundraising since its inception in 1986. 

The Grainger Inventors' Workshop 
will be an area for students to "tinker" 
and build equipment needed for their 
research. It will include wood working 
and metal working equipment, and com- 
puter design software. The workshop 
will be used by IMSA students and other 
students who participate in IMSA's 
external programs such as Suniiiivr 
'AD'Ventiires. 

David Grainger, chairman of W.W. 
Grainger. Inc. and president of The 
Grainger Foundation, called the project 
"an important investment in the future." 
Based in Skokie. W.W. Grainger, Inc. is 
a nationwide distributor of electrical, 
mechanical and other products to the 
industrial and commercial markets. 



"We are pleased to support the 
Grainger Inventors' Workshop, where the 
leaders of tomorrow can begin putting 
their ideas to work." Grainger said. 

Dr. David Workman. IMSA science 
team leader, said the workshop will 
enable IMSA to support students in ways 
not possible in the past. For example, 
several years ago a student wanted to 
build a variable support pendulum to 
demonstrate chaotic behavior. However, 
IMSA did not have the necessary equip- 
ment for the project. "With the Grainger I 
Inventors" Workshop, we will be able to 
support these types of student projects in 
the future." he said. 

The IMSA Fund for Advancement of 
Education, a not-for-profit corporation, 
enlists investments of corporate, founda- 
tion and individual donors in the 
Academy. These investments support 
cuiTiculum development projects, 
statewide outreach programs, minority 
recruitment programs, laboratory equip- 
ment purchases, facility enhancements, 
special student activities and a permanent 
endowment. 




IMSA jwtior Miitl 
Priuhanl of Hinckley 
shows Marshall 
Johnson how to use a 
Sony three chip camera. 
Johnson was one of sev- 
eral c/n-porale represen- 
tatives who atteiuled the 
Max 15 dedication of 
IMSA 's Toyota Video 
Produilion Laboratory. 
Last year. IMSA 
received a grant of ' 
$150,000 from the 
T(nota USA Foundation 
to help equip its stiUe- 
of -the -art lahorcUory. 



IMSA Executive Director Begins 
Term as ASCD President 



//; April. Dr. Srcplninic Pace MarshaU 
assumed the presidency of the 
Association for Siipenision and 
Curriculum Development (ASCD). the 
nation's largest educiition leadership 
organization. 

The next year will bring yet another set 
of professional challenges for IMSA 
Executive Director Dr. Stephanie Pace 
Marshall. As the nev\' president of the 
Association for Super\ ision and 
Curriculum De\elopment (ASCD). the 
nation's largest education leadership 
organization. Marshall said her priorities 
w ill focus on building partnerships and 
sharing resources. 

■"We live in an age where collaboration 
and alliances v\ ill position organizations 
to achieve goals they could not indepen- 
dently." she said. "I will v\ork in the year 
ahead to create those critical alliances in 
order to pro\ ide greater leverage to 
ASCD"s initiatives and expand the influ- 
ence of the association's resources." 



Elected b\ national niemhership in 
1991. Marshall took office at the conclu- 
sion of ASCD's 1992 national confer- 
ence, held April 4-7 in New Orleans. 
She had ser\ed as the association's presi- 
dent-elect during the past year. 

As a resource for thousands of educa- 
tors in the U.S. and around the world. 
ASCD pro\ides professional de\elop- 
ment experiences in curriculum planning. 
super\ isory skills and leadership desel- 
opment through annual conferences, 
training institutes, professional journals, 
and audio and \ ideo tapes. 

Marshall also predicted that her presi- 
dency will help enhance awareness of 
IMSA as a national leader in education. 

■"As president of ASCD. I have the 
unique opportunity to be able to showcase 
IMSA's inno\ati\e programs in curricu- 
lum, instruction and assessment and to 
bring additional resources of people and 
expertise to our community." she said. 
"This will enhance IMSA's internal pro- 
"rams and external/statewide initiatives." 




Senior class presiik'iu David Huddle of 
Highland welcomes Professor Martin 
Marry of the Universiry of Chicago 
Divinity School. Marry was the guest 
speaker at the inaugural Richard L. 
Honvhz Lecture on Ethics held at IMSA 
on April 15. The lecture series, named in 
memory of the Academy 's first legal coun- 
sel, was established following a gift from 
Susan S. Horwitz to the IMSA Fund for 
Advancemein of Education. 
(Photo by Christina Morkin) 



IMSA Awards IMPACT II Teaching Grants; 
Invites Students to Summer 'AD'Ventures 



I ^ nother 232 Illinois teachers have 
^■^ joined the IMPACT II network as 
recipients of the latest adaptor and dis- 
seminator teaching grants. 

IMPACT II. a national program, began 
in 1979 and now operates in more than 
30 sites throughout the country . Its pur- 
pose is to promote excellence in elemen- 
tary and secondary education by net- 
w orking teachers and their innovative 
ideas. 

Administered by the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy. 
Illinois' program focuses on mathematics 
and science education and is funded pri- 
marily by the State Board of Education. 
This year, for the tlrst time. IMSA also 
received support for additional grants 
from the private sector. Donors included 



Continental Bank (Chicago). Faucher 
Bros. Cartage (Chicago). Bank One 
(Bloomington-Normal and Springfield). 
Franklin Life Insurance Company 
(Springfield), Central Illinois Public 
Service Company (Springfield) and 
Gary-Wheaton Bank (Aurora). 

This spring. 82 disseminator grants 
were awarded to 152 teachers and 60 
adaptor grants were awarded to 1 GO 
teachers. Some of the grants w ere 
awarded to individual teachers, and some 
were awarded to teams of teachers. 

Disseminator grants enable public 
school elementary and secondary teach- 
ers to share their successful programs 
with colleagues through annual catalogs, 
workshops, conferences, and interschool 
visits. Adaptor grants support other 



teachers who want to use these programs 
in their classrooms. 

In addition to serving Illinois teachers 
through IMPACT II. this summer IMSA 
will welcome 180 Illinois students to its 
Summer '.AD'Ventures in Mathematics. 
Science and Technology program. The 
first session, for 80 students entering 
grades 7-8. will be held at IMSA June 
21-30. The second, for 100 students 
entering grades 9-10, will be held at 
Eastern Illinois University in Charleston 
June 17-July 1 . Eastern is being used as 
a site because of planned construction at 
IMSA and to test the effectiveness of 
holding Sunnner 'AD'Ventures at other 
sites in Illinois. 



Innovative Mathematics Course Enhances 
Students' Creative Problem Solving Skills 



If they ever doubted it before, 
students in Mathematical Investi- 
gations now know there is more than one 
way to solve a problem. And that, 
according to instructor Susan Eddins, is 
key to the new course's success. 

"We want students to think about prob- 
lems in a creative way." Eddins said. 
"The ability to approach situations with a 
variety of tools, not just using one 
method, is an invaluable skill for today's 
mathematician." 

Mathematical Investigations is a prod- 
uct of the curriculum redesign work done 
by IMSA's mathematics faculty during 
the past two years. The challenge, 
according to Eddins, was to find a way of 
integrating new ideas into a traditional 
mathematics curriculum without "penal- 
izing" students later on. "We were com- 
mitted to maintaining the structure and 
rigor of mathematics," Eddins said, "but 
within a discovery-based framework con- 
sistent with IMSA's strategic plan." 

Investigations and Problem Sets 

Designed primarily as an entry-level 
course for sophomores. Mathematical 
Investigations is written at the Honors 
Algebra II level and also is taught by 
Chuck Hamberg, George Milauskas, 
Diane Martling and Ron Vavrinek. The 
course features two approaches that run 
simultaneously. The first involves inves- 
tigations done in small groups using 
computers and graphing calculators, 
Eddins said. Quizzes and tests are given, 
but most of the daily work is completed 
in class. 

Sophomore Roberta Anderson of 
Malta said she likes working in a group 
but that it was not always easy. "Early in 
the year it was harder because we didn't 
know how to think with each other," she 
said. "But now we've even learned to 
teach each other." 

The second approach involves weekly 
problem sets; students arc given a series 
of 30-40 problems v\ hich are due the fol- 
lowing week. According to Eddins, the 
problem sets serve three purposes. 
"They keep under continual review the 



material students have learned, preview 
new ideas and provide reinforcement for 
the current material," she said. 

Eddins said students sometimes do not 
realize how many different concepts they 
are learning while completing the prob- 
lems. One reason for this is the unique 
way in which the concepts, which 
include algebra, geometry and trigonom- 
etry, are presented and connected to each 
other. 

"The different mathematical concepts 
are introduced in slow stages but are 
often not a specific topic for class discus- 
sion," Eddins said. "The main thrust of 
the course is functions, and in doing the 
problem sets, students learn to deal with 
functions in many different ways. 
Initially, students may not be not aware 
of how much they've learned." 

Independent Thinking 

Anderson said in the beginning she 

struggled with the problem sets because 



they were not discussed in class. 
However, in time, she learned to 
approach problems differently. "Now 
it's a lot easier for me because I have 
learned how to think the problems 
through and that's almost as important as 
solving the problem itself," she said. 
"The course forces you to think more for 
yourself." 

Sophomore Lynnette Galloway of 
Country Club Hills agreed, adding that 
since taking Mathematical 
Investigations, she has learned to look for 
more than one way to solve a problem. 
"When you look for more than one way," 
she said, "it makes mathematics more 
interesting." 

Eddins hopes students will leave 
Mathematical Investigations with a 
renewed confidence about solving prob- 
lems. "We believe students can and will 
gain a sense of real mathematical 
power. ..their own." 



Smithsonian Taps IMSA for 
Unique Curriculum Project 

The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy and the Duke Ellington 
School of the Arts in Washington. D.C.. have been named co-beneficiaries of 
a $250,000 congressional grant to the Smithsonian Institution. 

As educational partners, IMSA and Duke Ellington are developing cunicu- 
lum models that integrate instruction in mathematics, science, the arts and 
humanities. Successful models will be shared with other schools interested in 
integrating their curricula. 

Representatives from Ixuh schools met several times this winter and spring to 
discuss learning principles, develop integrative learning systems and visit each 
other's classrooms. In June, faculty and staff members from Duke Ellington 
will visit IMSA for three days of training in the writing of curriculum modules. 
In July, they will develop specific pilot programs to test this fall. 

A national task force, scheduled to meet in September, will oversee the 
project. The task force will include representatives of the National Science 
Foundation. National Endowment for the Arts. National Endowment for the 
Himianities. National Gallery of Art and John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Perfomiing Arts. 



T R A I L B L A Z E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

IMSA coinened a national conference 
on prohlenl-ba^ed learning Ma\ 4-6 at 
the internationally-renowned W'ingspread 
Conference Center in Racine, Wisconsin. 
National experts in problem-soK ing. 
ethics, assessment, teaching, curriculum. 
and science and mathematics education 
attended the conference, 

Executi\e Director Dr. Stephanie Pace 

Marshall recently assumed the presiden- 
C) of the Association for Super\ision and 
Curriculum Development . the nation's 
largest education leadership organization 
(see story on page 5). 

In April, social science teachers Dr. 
Jim Victory and Bernard Hollister pre- 
sented a session on the use of historical 
data bases at the regional conference of 
the National Council for the Social 
Studies in Cedar Rapids. low a. 

Chemistr\ teacher Dr. Richard Dods 

will contribute chapters on diabetes mel- 
litus to two textbooks published b>' C.V. 
Mosby Publishing. One textbook is 
designed for medical students and the 
other for medical technologists. 

IMSA physics teacher Patrick 
LaMaster helped design and write a 
teachers guide for high school physics 
teachers using the videotape ""Catching 
the Sun." The video aired nationalI> on 
PBS March 28. 



Student and Staff 
Achievements 

Nine students were selected to present 
their research at the Sixth National 
Conference on Undergraduate Research 
at the University of Minnesota in Minnea- 
polis. IMSA was the only high school 
in\ ited to participate in the conference. 

A team of 13 IMSA students won the 
1992 Illinois Science Olympiad state 
championship held on April 4. The team 
placed 8th in the National Science Oh m- 
piad at .Auburn Uni\'ersity on May 16. 




Students, facult\, staff and mentors 
participated in the fourth annual IMSA 
Presentation Day on April 28, Sixty 
indi\ idual and team presentations were 
given on participants" original research in 
science, mathematics, fine arts, social 
science and humanities. 

On .April 25, a team of 29 students cap- 
tured first place in the 1992 Illinois 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics 
(ICTM) State Math Contest. 

Ten IMSA students were named to this 
year's all-state band, orchestra and cho- 
rus by the Illinois Music Educators 
Association. 

Four IMSA faculty members — Carol 
Baness. Bernard Hollister. Dr. Riva 
Kuhl and Patrick McWilliams — ha\ e 

been awarded summer fellowships from 
the National Endow ment for the 
Humanities. 

Eight IMSA students were awarded 
gold and siher medals in the 1992 
National Latin Exam. 

A team of 29 IMSA students w on first 
place in the American Computer Science 
League (ACSL) competition announced 
on .April 21. 



AiKii \'illi\iiliiiii (iJChiciiiic prcsciils lii.s 
rvsciirch on cluios iiinl hii)l(ii;iiiil \\slc'iii\ at 
llic IMSA Bdiinl i>l Trii.\icc\ iiicclini; in April. 
Villivahim and fellow snidcnl Michael 
Onihri'llo of East Moline also showciised 
I heir work a! die Aitideniy's annual 
Fresenlalion Dax held April 2<S'. 

IMSA students Fred Chen, Patrick 
Keenan, Chris Jeris, Neil Rubin and 
Stephen Wang w ere among the 1 ,^9 stu- 
dents nationw ide v\ ho qualified to take 
the United States Mathematical 
Olympiad (USAMO). Wang is one of 
only 23 students in the country to qualify 
for summer training for the USA 
Mathematical Olympiad team. 

IMSA sophomore Debbie Linksvayer 

of Springfield w rote an article that was 
published in the February issue of Illinois 
Hlstoiy: A Magazine for Yoiini> People. 
Her article w as entitled ""The Debate on 
Do us: las." 



Alumni Achievements 

Robin May, "90, Occidental College, 
was one of nine students chosen to 
recei\ e a Richter Undergraduate 
Research Fellowship to study the social 
implications of \irtual realit\. 

Maggie Taylor, "89, California 
Institute of Technology, is conducting 
research in gravitational-wave detection 
along w ith a team of physicists from 
Caltech. Their work was featured in the 
March issue of Scientific American in an 
article entitled ""Catchins the Wave." 



IMSA Student Maps Out Roman 
Empire Using Computer Program 



VI I hile learning about the growth 
. \_ of the Roman Empire in his 
World Studies class, things just weren't 
"clicking"' for IMSA student Tons 
Rippy. So Rippy. a junior from Salem, 
decided to write his own computer pro- 
gram depicting ancient Roman history 
from 500 B.C- A.D, 130. 

His program. "The Roman World." is a 
simulation of the Roman expansion 
through a computer generated map. "I 
wanted to tr\ and look at history in a 
different way." Rippy said. 

Social science teachers Bernard 
Hollister and Dr. Jim Victory believe the 
program could be applied to any history 
course. "The most significant feature is 
that it's a model and could be applied to 
other countries as well." Hollister said. 
"Theoretically, you could examine 
numerous maps simultaneously which 
could then be used to pose some very 
complicated questions." Victory said. 

The computer generated map of 
Europe allows students to .see the step- 
by-step transformation of the Roman 



Empire right before their very eyes. 
"You can create the road systems to see 
where people traveled, look at the sea 
routes they used and see how different 
events in history affected the growth." 
Rippy said. For example, yellow dots on 
the map represent cities or villages under 
Roman control: as the time period 
increases, so does the expansion of the 
Roman Empire and the number of yellow 
dots on the screen. 

Rippy added that seeing events taking 
place makes learning easier and faster. 
"It is better than just looking at handouts 
and diagrams and trying to piece it all 
together," he said. In addition, the data 
in a computer program can be manipulat- 
ed to create new perspectives and new 
questions. 

Rippy said it took him approximately 
three weeks to gather information for the 
program and three hours to write it. The 
program was developed in the computer 
language C-n-. after learning it in an 
IMSA computer class taught by Rich 
Kick, mathematics teacher. 




IMSA sophomore Lisa Aquino proudly 
lionors Andre Dixon, biology teacher 
from Lane Technical High School, 
Chicago. On April 10, more than 100 
Illinois teachers received the 1992 IMSA 
Auard of Excellence during IMSA 's 
annual Teacher Recognition Day. This 
event honors special home school teach- 
ers who have challenged, inspired and 
supported IMSA students in the past. 
(Photo by DIG-IT Photographs) 



H^IMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506- i 000 



NON PROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



Address Correction Requested 



L 




i 



LLINOIS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE ACADEMY 



r*— I W\ SA ^ Pioneering Educational Community 



Volume 6 No. 4 • Summer 1992 



Wingspread Conference Showcases 
IMSA's Leadership in Problem-Based 
Learning for K-12 Education 



ducation leaders from throughout 
J the country met at the internation- 



ally-renowned Wingspread Conference 
Center in Racine, Wisconsin. May 4-6. 
for a conference on problem-based learn- 
ing sponsored by the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science Academy, the 
Johnson Foundation and the Hitachi 
Foundation. 

IMS A has piloted the use of problem- 
based learning in several courses includ- 
ing Science Sociery- and the Future. This 
award-winning course features the use of 
■'ill-structured" problems to foster the 
development of students" problem find- 
ing, problem solving, critical thinking 
and ethical decision-making skills. 
(See box on page 8). 

In addition to Wingspread. the 
Academy's work in problem-based learn- 
ing was featured recently in the national 
newsletters of two major educational 
associations — the Association for 
Supervision and Curriculum 
Development {Update. August 1992) and 



SIDE 



Admissions: Class of "95 5 

Graduation: Class of "92 3 

IMSA Fund Highlights 4 

IMSA Leadership Conference 6 

Minority Student Programs 5 

Pro Baseball Player 6 

Teacher Training 6 

Trailblazers 7 



-'>''Cr ,: rt\ 



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William J. Slepien, director of the Center for Problem-Based Learning at IMSA. records student 
comments as they brainstorm issues and options (scientific, legal, political, ethical, moral, etc.) 
related to a complex medical problem. 



the American Association of School 
Administrators {Leadership News. 
June 15, 1992), and will be featured in a 
forthcoming journal article {Journal for 
the Education of the Gifted). 

Center for Problem-Based Learning 

To expand the scope of its work. 
IMSA has established a national Center 
for Problem-Based Learning on its cam- 
pus. William J. Stepien. social science 
teacher, has been named the Center" s 
director. 

To assist IMSA educators and other 
educators thoughout Illinois and the 
nation learn more about problem-based 
learning, the Center is sponsoring the fol- 
lowing activities during the 1992-93 



school year: 

• Written Materials - A packet of writ- 
ten materials on problem-based learn- 
ing is available upon request. 

• Informational Meeting - A spring 
1993 informational meeting in Illinois 
will provide both Illinois and out-of- 
state educators with an overview of 
problem-based learning, including 
information on how to become more 
involved in the Center's research, 
development and training activities. 

• Classroom Visitations - Throughout 
the 1992-93 school year. Stepien will 
host individual and/or small groups of 
educators who would like to observe 

(continued on page 8) 



MSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora. Illinois 60506-1000 
708/801-6000 



BOARD OF TRi'STEES 

President 

James D. Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Vice President 

Dr. Leon Ledemian. Nobel Laureate 

Director Emeritus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Trustees 

John Buird 
Teacher o( Ph) sics 
Quincy High School 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball. Incorporated 

Dr. Lain Braskamp 
Dean. College of Education 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Fred Conforti 

President 

BRK Electronics 

Sheila Griffin 

Director of Corporate Advertising Worldwide 

Motorola Incorporated 

Cary Israel 

Executive Director 

Illinois Community College Board 

Gary D. Jewel 
Supenntendent of Schools 
Aurora West School District #129 

Robert Leinlnger 
State Superintendent 
State Board of Education 

John McEachem Jr. 

President 

Wayne Circuits Incorporated 

Dr. David Mintzer 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

Physics and Astronomy 
Northwestern University 

Jesus Manuel Sosa 
Interdepartmental Manager 
Depariment of Language and 

Cultural Education 
Chicago Public Schools 

Marvin Stnink 

Retired President and Chief Executive Officer 

Madison Bank & Trust Company 

Dr. Richard Wagner 

Executive Director 

State Board of Higher Education 

Dr. Benjamin Williams 

Principal 

Percy Julian Junior High School. Oak Park 



NOVA is published quarieriy by the 
IMSA Communications Office. 

Editor 

Catherine C. Veal 

Staff Writer 

Brenda Buschbacher 



From the 

Executive 

Director 





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Dear Members of the IMSA Community, 

\ s we prepare to begin our seventh school year, let me summarize a few of the 

-\_ highlights from this summer at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. 
We thoroughly enjoyed hosting students from throughout Illinois for our Summer 
'AD'Ventwes in Mathematics, Science and Technoliiiiy program, as well as IMSA 
Challenge students from Chicago. East St. Louis and Joliet. 

In addition, IMSA sponsored professional development activities for Illinois educa- 
tors, and the Center for Problem-Based Learning at IMSA began answering inquiries 
from throughout Illinois and the nation following the success of our recent Wingspread 
Conference and coverage in two national education publications. 

Several of these important external initiatives — part of IMSA"s commitment to serv- 
ing other educators and students — are featured in this issue of NOVA. 

As we look forward to the start of another school year, we anticipate a challenging 
and eventful fall semester. At this time, it is my pleasure to announce that Dr. Edward 
Teller, one of the most celebrated physicists of our time, will be IMSA's special guest 
for a two-week period this fall. While on campus. Dr. Teller will meet with IMSA stu- 
dents, faculty and staff, and invited guests. In addition, he will be the speaker for 
IMSA's second annual James R. Thompson Leadership Lecture. 

Dr. Teller has received worldwide acclaim for his research in chemical, molecular 
and nuclear physics; quantum mechanics; thermonuclear reactions: and the applica- 
tions of nuclear energy. He is perhaps best known for his work with the Manhattan 
Project at the now famous Los Alamos Laboratory: while there he focused his attention 
on the possibility of releasing energy through nuclear fusion — research that eventually 
led to the first test of the hydrogen bomb in 1 952. 

While the implications of his work are not without controversy, as an institution that 
values learning through the exchange and debate of divergent points of view. IMSA 
very much looks forward to the visit of this major figure in human history. 

As we look forward to the 1 992-93 school year, I am confident that with your sup- 
port it will become another remarkable chapter in IMSA's history. 



Sincerely. 




-ly-ix^ 



■^M^/ 



Stephanie Pace Marshall, Ph.D, 
Executive Director 



dHtt 



Formal Commencement Ceremony 
Honors IMSA's Class of 1992 



On May 30, members of the Illinois 
Mathematics and Science 
Academy's Class of 1992 reflected on 
their high school years and future plans 
during formal commencement cere- 
monies at Aurora's Paramount Arts 
Centre. 

Commencement speaker Dr. Florence 
Haseltine. director of the Center for 
Population Research at the National 
Institutes of Health in Bethesda. 
Maryland, challenged the seniors to be 
flexible and willing to change with the 
times. 

'"Your education should prime you for 
these changes," Haseltine said. "The 
knowledge of many indi\'idual subjects 
will soon be dated, but the principles and 
analytic capabilities that you ha\ e 
learned will be tools for you to master 
new topics and keep up with these 
changes," she said. 

IMSA E.xecutive Director Dr. 
Stephanie Pace Marshall applauded the 
seniors' awareness of their moral obliga- 
tions to humanity. '"As the Academy 
continues to examine its leadership role, 
many of our seniors have been instru- 



mental in challenging us to see ourselves 
as members of a global village." Marshall 
said. 

"Through the dynamic leadership of 
some members of the senior class and 
other student Pugw ash Society members, 
our final Saturday Seminar entitled 
Visions for a Sustainable World: A 
Seminar on Science. Technology and 
Social Responsihilily was a tremendous 
success and led us to new understanding 
of the interdependence of our planet," she 
said. 

Student speaker Thomas Shidle of 
Palatine warned his classmates to not 
distance themselves from America's 
problems. "It will require a remarkable 
effort to avoid losing touch with the 
America that we are destined to lead," 
Shidle said. "In an age where ethics and 
integrity are coming to be viewed as 
impediments to success, we cannot 
afford to lose sight," he added. ""Given 
all our problems, this country does not 
need blind leaders." 

Following certification by Principal 
John D. Court that members of the Class 
of 1992 had met graduation requirements. 




W'aheedii Sliiiil<li oj Scliauniiniri; spoils die 
smile of a proud new }>raduale. 

students received diplomas from Board 
President James Pearson and commence- 
ment medallions from Dr. Marshall. 
Graduates and their families then 
joined faculty and staff members for the 
traditional reception on IMSA's campus. 




Class of 1992 seniors celebrate their hig da\! Pictured are Terez Ivy of East St. Louis, Suzy Hyuii of Hinsdale, and Slieri Hubbert of Winchester. 




IMSA FUND FOR 
ADVANCEMENT OF EDUCATION 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President 

James R. Thompson 

Fanner and Chairman of the E.xecuti\'e Committee 

Winston & Strawn 

Executive Vice President 

Donald E. Nordlund 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Staiey Continental. Inc- 

Vice President 

D. Chet McKee 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Copley Memorial Hospital 

Secretary/Treasurer 

Paul J O'Hollaren 
Director General 
Moose International 

Directors 

Linda Anderson 
Civic Leader 

Roger E. Anderson 

Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Contmenta] Bank of Chicago 

G. Carl Ball 
Chairman of the Board 
George J. Ball Company 

Marjone Craig Benton 

President. Chapin Hall Center for Children 

University of Chicago 

Michael J. Birck 
President 
Tellabs. Inc. 

Richard H. Brown 
President 
Illinois Bell 

Willard Bunn 111 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Banc One Illinois Corporation 

Clifford L. Greenwalt 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Central Illinois Public Service Company 

Susan S. Horwitz 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Aurora National Bank 

John E. Jones 

President. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

CBI Industries 

Dr. Leon M. Lederman. Nobel Laureate 

Director Ementus 

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Steven H. Lesnik 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Lesnik and Company 

Gordon R. Lehman 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Amsted Industnes. Inc 

James D- Pearson 
President 
Aurora Industries 

Harr) C. Sionecipher 

President and Chief Executive Officer 

Sundstrand Corporation 

William J. White 

President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer 

Bell & Howell Company 

Director of Institutional Advancement 

Ted Parge 



IMSA Fund Tops $3.6 Million 



^ ~ he Illinois Mathematics and 

1= Science Academy Fund for 
Advancement of Education raised a 
record $963,245 from the private sector 
in 1991-92. including its largest grant to 
date of $325,000. Fund Board president 
James R. Thompson said this puts the 
Fund over the $3.6 million mark in 
fundraising since its inception in 1986. 

The 1991-92 figure represents a 10% 
increase over last year's total with a 21% 
increase in the number of donors. 
Thompson said this is especially signifi- 
cant given the recessionary economy and 
uncertain futures for many corporations 
and individuals. "In a time when many 
people and corporations are having to 
make difficult choices, we are grateful 
that our donors chose IMSA as a sound 
investment in the future," Thompson 
said. 

The $325,000 grant from The Grainger 
Foundation of Skokie will be used to 
construct and operate an inventors" work- 
shop for students. 

Among other Fund-related highlights 
in 1991-92. Ted Parge. director of insti- 



tutional advancement, cited the 
following: 

• Establishment of two new lecture series 
for students and guests 

• Mini-grants totaling more than $8,000 
for IMSA employees to implement their 
creative ideas that support IMSA's 
mission 

• IMSA"s first holiday greeting card, pro- 
duced in cooperation with Illinois Bell 

• Increase in parent giving from $23,600 
to $41,978 

• The establishment of a Public Relations 
Council to advise Academy staff on 
marketing strategies 

• Contributions ($6,800-1-) from seven 
Illinois coiporations to fund additional 
IMPACT II teaching grants for educa- 
tors in their service areas. 

To help increase awareness of IMSA, 
several informational luncheons were 
held for business and community leaders 
at companies throughout Illinois, includ- 
ing Illinois Power in Decatur, Illinois 
Bell in Chicago, and Sundstrand 
Coiporation in Rockford. 



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A douor recognition pUu/ue. on display in IMSA 'v main lohhy, pays trihiite to lite major donors to 
the IMSA Fund for Advancement of Education. The plaque is updated periodically to accommo- 
date new supporters, such as The Grainger Foundation. 



IMSA Fund Welcomes New Donors 



The IMSA Fund welcomes the follow- 
ing first-time corporate and foundation 
donors of $500 or more (February 5-July 
30.1992) to the Council for Educational 
Distinction in Illinois: 



Illinois Power Company 
Philip S. Harper Foundation 
The Johnson Foundation 
Waste Management. Inc. 
Winston & Strawn Foundation 



IMSA Invites 7th 
Sophomore Class 

Black, Hispanic 
Enrollments Double 

A total of 200 students from 
throughout Illinois were invited to 
enroll this fall as members of the 
Illinois Mathematics and Science 
Academy's seventh sophomore class. 

And this year. IMSA began to see 
positive results of its efforts to 
improve the diversity of the applicant 
pool-specifically to attract more black 
and Hispanic applicants (see related 
ston- to the right). The number and 
competitiveness of these underrepre- 
sented applicants impro\ed. enabling 
IMSA to increase their representation 
in the invited sophomore class. Black 
enrollment increased from 57c for the 
Class of 1994 to 10.5% for the Class 
of 1995. In addition. Hispanic enroll- 
ment doubled from 49c in 1991-92 to 
8% for 1992-93 sophomores. 

Dr. LuAnn Smith, director of 
admissions, said that once again qual- 
ified applicants far exceeded the num- 
ber of spaces available. "The selec- 
tion committee was extremely 
impressed with the credentials of all 
the applicants." she said. "The 
strength and diversity of the invited 
IMSA students enhances the educa- 
tion of all attending." 

Chosen from a total of 724 appli- 
cants from 381 schools, the invited 
Class of 1995 represents 134 schools 
and 1 15 communities throughout the 
state. Students offered admission 
include 85 girls and 1 15 boys. The 
average SAT mathematics and verbal 
scores for the class are 638 and 520 
respectively. This compares to the 
national average for college-bound 
seniors of 474 and 422. 

"In addition to congratulating the 
invited students, we acknowledge and 
thank school administrators, teachers 
and counselors for supporting the aca- 
demic goals of their students," Smith 
said. 



Challenge Students Tackle 
Thorium Waste Problem 



^ ~ his summer. 1 17 se\enth and 

m eighth grade minorit\ students 
from Chicago. East St. Louis and Joliel 
scrutinized, summarized and theorized as 
scientists for the Illinois Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission. 

As participants in IMSA"s first 
Summer Challenge program, their job 
was to answer the question "What 
Should We Do About the Thorium 
Waste in West Chicago?" 





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Duruig their week at IMSA. students 
proposed solutions to the thorium waste 
problem at the Kerr-McGee factory after 
visiting the site, surveying the surround- 
ing community, interview ing scientists 
and government agents, conducting 
experiments, and observing demonstra- 
tions. On the last day. they presented 
their solutions to nuclear radiation and 
state government experts. 

The July 12-17 program was designed 
to enhance students" problem-sohing. 
mathematics, science and communica- 
tion skills. 

Student Qiana Stevens of Crest Hill 
(near Joliet) said she learned that making 
decisions in a bureaucracy is not always 
easy. "In matters like this, there is so 
much to know and people are telling you 
different things so it can be hard to make 
the right decision." Stevens said. "I 
understand why it has taken so long to 
get this matter solved." 

Summer Challenge is one component 
of IMSA's three-year enrichment pro- 
grams intended to increase achievement 
and moti\ ation among minority and eco- 
nomically disadvantaged students in 
grades 7-9. 

The programs are funded by various 
private sector grants including major 
grants from the Alfred P. Sloan and 
Lloyd A. Fry Foundations. In addition to 
the summer component, students attend 
programs in their home communities 
during the .school year. 



An IMSA Challenge student collects data on 
conditions at the Thorium Waste site in West 
Chicago. 




IMSA Hosts National Teacher Training Sessions; 
Convenes Fourth Annual Leadership Conference 



'-1 — he Illinois Mathematics and 

1_ Science Academy hosted seven 
National Diffusion Network (NDN) pro- 
grams this summer for mathematics, sci- 
ence and technology teachers, grades 1-12. 

The network is funded by the U.S. 
Department of Education. During the 
sessions, teachers learned how to imple- 
ment exemplary programs from through- 
out the nation in their classrooms. 

Some of the one-day sessions included 
demonstrations on how physics teachers 
can use controlled computer simulations 
to illustrate physical events and how 
math teachers can motivate underachiev- 
ers to succeed in math. 

On June 23-24, IMSA held its fourth 
annual Leadership Conference. The 1992 
conference was attended by 240 Illinois 
educators from 19 District Learning 
Leadership Teams. The 19 teams were 
among the 30 school district teams that 



I C.&A-1. SEauEwa n 




NEtrSs ) ,. »- ^ / w 







Illinois educators, participants in the 1992 
IMSA Leadership Conference, learn about 
the Concerns-Based Adoption Model, a well- 
researched method for proinniini; education- 
al change. 



began working with IMSA and Motorola 
University in 1991-92 to restructure their 
mathematics and science programs. 

This year's conference. "Creating a 
Culture of Quality," provided a forum for 
exploring issues related to creating quali- 
ty within educational systems as they 
continue to change. 



During the year, members of the 
District Learning Leadership Teams 
focused on specific areas of change in 
their respective districts: curriculum, 
instruction and assessment in mathemat- 
ics and science education, and the inte- 
gration of the two disciplines with other 
areas of study. 



IMSA Graduate Hits the Big Leagues 

il^ What do the Ivy League and the Major Leagues have in common? 

^ Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 1992 graduate John Turlais. 



Turlais, a resident of downstate 
Flora, is the first IMSA student-athlete 
to be drafted or signed by a profession- 
al sports team. He was picked in the 
1 0th round of the Major League 
Baseball draft by the Pittsburgh Pirates 
on June I and signed with the team two 
days later. 

Turlais also was accepted by 
Harvard University and will enroll this 
fall with plans to major in pre-law or 
the social sciences. Most students are 
required to attend Harvard their entire 
freshmen year before taking a semester 
leave, but special arrangements were 
approved for Turlais. "I talked to 
Harvard and because I've been at a 
residential school for three years they 
are going to allow me to take my 
spring semester leave from Harvard to 
attend spring training and play pro 
ball," he said. 

Following his graduation from 
IMSA. Turlais began training with the 
summer rookie league at Pirate City in 
Bradenton, Florida. When asked how 
far he thought baseball would take him, 
Turlais replied "I always try to improve 
my skills and do the best for my team. 
I just play the game." 

He plays the game well. His 19- 



game statistics during the 1991-92 
school year included: 

• .509 batting average: 27 hits out of 53 
at bats 

• 1 8 extra base hits, including 8 home 
runs 

• 26 RBIs 

• 28 runs scored 

• 21 stolen bases. 

At IMSA, Turlais was a three-year, 
three-sport athlete excelling in soccer, 
basketball and baseball. The many 
highlights in his high school sports 
career include being named the 
Chicago Tribune's Baseball Athlete of 
the Week, and receiving numerous 
baseball and basketball honors from 
The Beacon-News (Aurora). 

His talents, however, do not end with 
athletics and academics. Turlais also is 
a talented tuba player. He has played 
1st chair and principal tuba positions 
for eight years. 

Turlais does not expect to have any 
trouble balancing his studies at Harvard 
with professional baseball. "I consider 
them two separate entities and I have a 
good time doing both," Turlais said. "T 
consider baseball yet another challenge 
for myself." 



T R A I L B L A Z E R S 



State and National 
Leadership 

Executive Director Dr. Stephanie 
Pace Marshall was in\ lied to ser\e on 
the National Council tor the De\elop- 
ment of Standards in History and met 
with members in June. She also was 
asked to speak at the National Confer- 
ence of the Education Commission of the 
States in August. Her remarks focused 
on systemic change in education. 

In May. IMSA's Instructional 
Technology Laboratory staff hosted the 
Chicago Chapter meeting of the 
International Interactive Communi- 
cations Society. IMSA faculty and staff 
demonstrated the use of the Academy's 
Telecommunications Instructional 
Consortium classroom w hich enables 
IMSA to broadcast mathematics and sci- 
ence courses to students in several area 
schools. 

Dr. Michael Palmisano. director of 
assessment and research, became presi- 
dent of the Illinois Association for 
Supervision and Curriculum 
Development in June. 

Social science teacher William J. 
Stepien and physics teacher Dr. David 
Workman held four days of training for 
1 1 Chicago teachers in the use of prob- 
lem-based learning. The Chicago teach- 
ers then helped conduct IMSA's Summer 
Challenge program for 117 minority stu- 
dents from Chicago, East St. Louis and 
Joliet. 

In May. USA Today cited IMSA as one 
of several examples of "'schools that 
shine. ..bring credit to the U.S. education 
system. ..(and) offer insights into excel- 
lence." The article, entitled "IMSA: 
Haven for technocrats." cited the 
Academy's Science. Socien and Future 
course, video and computer resources, 
and innovative class schedule which pro- 
vides extended time for research as sig- 
nificant program highlights. 



Student and Staff 
Aciiievements 

Sandra S. Park of Wheaton was one 
of only 60 juniors nationwide chosen to 
attend a 1992 Telluride Association sum- 
mer program. Park attended coUege- 
le\el seminars and lectures by guest 
speakers. 

IMSA physics teacher Patrick 
LaMaster was selected as one of three 
Illinois nominees for the 1992 
Presidential Awards for Excellence in 
Secondary Science Teaching. 

Student Demetrios Kouzoukas of 

Des Plaines was one of only 1 2 students 
in the nation chosen to spend the entire 
summer as a Republican page in the 
U.S. House of Representatives in 
Washington. D.C. 

Ashley Morgan. Mathew Horr. 
Niccolo Delia Penna. Steven 
Crutchfield. Stephen Wang and Glenn 
Donnelly were honored by the Northern 
Illinois Chapter of the American 
Association of Teachers of German for 
outstanding performance on the 1992 
National German Exam. 



Alumni Achievements 

Katina Daniell. '89. Gustavus 
Adolphus College, was selected for a 
summer internship at the Mayo Clinic in 
Rochester. Minnesota. She conducted 
immunological research. 

Andrew Hocker. "91. Rice University, 
received a Bonner Lab Summer 
Fellowship to the T.W. Bonner Nuclear 
Laboratory at Rice University. He con- 
ducted research in high energy physics. 

Brian Butler. '89. Carnegie Mellon 

University, was named the 1993 Andrew- 
Carnegie Society Presidential Scholar by 
the School of Computer Science. He 
also has established his own small com- 
puter software business. Autosoft. 



Rowan Lockwood. "89. Yale 
University, is pursuing paleoanthropo- 
logical studies in Africa after receiving 
the Bates and Class of 196.3 Scholarships 
from Yale University. 




This summer. John Turlais. Class of 1992, 
traded in his IMSA Titan uniform for one of 
tlie Pitlshurvli Pirates. Turlais is IMSA 's 
first sUident-athlete to be drafted or signed 
b\ a professional sports team ( see story on 
page 6). 



WingSpread icoiumned from page I) 

IMSA's problem-based Science. 

Society and the Fiitiire class (co-taught 

by physics teacher Dr. David 

Workman). 

In addition, the Center will make a pre- 
sentation on problem-based learning at 
the Illinois Network of Accelerated 
Schools' fall 1992 conference, sponsored 
by the Illinois State Board of Education. 

Wingspread Conference 

The system of problem-based learning 
was endorsed by Wingspread conference 
participants who discussed ways to 
expand curriculum development and 
teacher training for K-12 classrooms. 

Dr. Elliot Eisner, professor of educa- 
tion and art at Stanford University, gave 
the keynote address. "The Pursuit of 
Uniqueness in an Age of National 
Standards." He said America's schools 
need to be re-designed to prepare stu- 
dents for the challenges that lie ahead in 
their lives, noting that the fundamental 
issue of transference is missing. 

"We have designed schools that provide 
kids with arrays of expectations and tasks 
that they will never encounter any other 
place in their life." Eisner said. "Life is 
not a multiple choice test," he said. 

IMSA Executive Director Dr. 
Stephanie Pace Marshall noted that real 
reform in the nation's educational system 
must effect everyone involved to 
succeed. 




Education leaders observe IMSA students demonstratiufi prolilein-liased learning at the recent 
Wingspread Conference. 



"Systems do not change by tinkering 
with the reform of their external struc- 
tures, they change because of fundamen- 
tal operational and cultural renorming 
from within." she said. 

Conference participants agreed that 
while IMSA's work is promising, addi- 
tional research is needed to determine 
how all students can benefit from prob- 
lem-based learning. 

"Problem-based learning is a strong 
paradigm out of which or through which 
many topics and skills can be learned," 
said Dr. Michael Haney. program direc- 
tor at the National Science Foundation. 
"If the problems are rich enough and the 
teachers adept enough, wonderful things 
can happen." 



r^lMSA 



Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy 

1 500 West Sullivan Road 
Aurora, Illmois 60506-1000 



Characteristics of 

Problem-Based 

Learning 

• The curriculum is organized into a 
series of "ill-structured" problems 
that increase in complexity and 
diversity. 

• Students devote weeks or months 
of study to solve one problem. 

• Problems are interdisciplinary and 
cut across scientific, ethical, eco- 
nomic, and legal dimensions. 

• Most of the relevant information to 
solve the problem is not available 
from the outset. 

• Teachers do not provide all the 
answers: they instead serve as 
resources, guides and "cognitive 
coaches." 



NONPROFIT ORG. 

BULK RATE 

U.S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

AURORA, IL 

PERMIT NO. 129 



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